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Greatest book you've ever read?


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#41 garbo

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 12:39 AM

QUOTE (GeddyRulz @ Mar 8 2011, 04:58 PM)
QUOTE (garbo @ Mar 8 2011, 11:54 AM)
Epic literature.

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I know it well.   laugh.gif

Actually, it IS great.  The voice in the Little Critter books is a kind of "healthy cynicism," which I enjoy.

I completely agree.  I have actually an anthology of the great Little Critter books.  I still read them, but don't readily admit this to adults.  They're just so wonderful.

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#42 In A Tidewater Surge

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 12:51 AM

QUOTE (Show Don't Tell @ Mar 8 2011, 07:27 PM)
I can narrow it down to two:

Nineteen Eighty-Four (George Orwell)
Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)

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#43 psionic11

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 08:54 PM

QUOTE (In A Tidewater Surge @ Mar 9 2011, 12:51 AM)
QUOTE (Show Don't Tell @ Mar 8 2011, 07:27 PM)
I can narrow it down to two:

Nineteen Eighty-Four (George Orwell)
Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)

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+1

I've only read a few of the classic mentions elsewhere in this thread -- Great Gatsby, Brothers Kazamorov, Of Mice and Men, Catcher in the Rye -- none of those really stick out like the 2 above.

I also actually really enjoyed Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time, having read the whole series twice.  The latest 2 novels by Brandon are both very good also... can't wait for the final book this November.

Ender's Game series is pretty good, easy reading, great concepts


#44 In A Tidewater Surge

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:11 PM

Ender's Game wasn't bad, though I found that Ender's Shadow was more well written, I also liked the different point of view it had.

#45 CMWriter

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:32 PM

I liked Ender's Game -- a LOT -- but it didn't resonate for me like the ones I mentioned. It's a very fine book and I love to re-read it, but it's not quite "BEST EVER OH MY GOSH" for me.
I forgot to put 1984. Chilling book.. I almost took AP Lit' this year just so I would have an excuse to dive into that book.. though I ended up doing just that anyways.

I haven't read Brave New World, but I know it was also on the AP list. (Right next to 1984.) I've heard it's very good. Thoughts, anyone who's read it?

#46 Show Don't Tell

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 11:22 PM

QUOTE (CMWriter @ Mar 11 2011, 10:32 PM)
I haven't read Brave New World, but I know it was also on the AP list. (Right next to 1984.) I've heard it's very good. Thoughts, anyone who's read it?

I'm about a third through it now. Pretty good so far. It looks like this is the counterpart to Nineteen Eighty-Four -- both stories are set in dystopian societies, but, essentially, where Nineteen Eighty-Four uses violence and pain, Brave New World uses pleasure and happiness.

#47 In A Tidewater Surge

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 01:25 AM

Read 1984 instead. Brave New World wasn't nearly as good. Jordan's pretty much summed it up, but I felt like BNW left me wanting, while 1984 kind of threw me on the ground and had its way with me unsure.gif

#48 CMWriter

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 01:37 AM

QUOTE (In A Tidewater Surge @ Mar 12 2011, 12:25 AM)
Read 1984 instead. Brave New World wasn't nearly as good. Jordan's pretty much summed it up, but I felt like BNW left me wanting, while 1984 kind of threw me on the ground and had its way with me unsure.gif

I started 1984 but keep getting distracted. Need to finish the darned thing! It's really fascinating so far.
Mmm, I don't know. I have friends in AP that told me they liked BNW better than 1984, so I'll just read it and see for myself.

In any case, thanks for the info, guys. I'll get through both of 'em eventually -- if I can ever find a copy of BNW, that is. |:

#49 In A Tidewater Surge

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 02:09 AM

I read the two of them back to back, so that may have skewed my opinion of BNW a tad.. but I wasn't too fond of it really; on to For Whom The Bell Tolls though biggrin.gif

#50 Tony R

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 06:17 AM

My pick is "To Kill A Mockingbird" followed closely by Dos Passos' "USA" trilogy.

In the world of fantasy I would choose Donaldson's "Chronicles Of Thomas Covenent" and in horror "The Excorcist".
In Science Fiction I just lean towards "The Foundation" Trilogy.  

#51 Principled Man

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 08:15 AM

Fiction:  Frank Herbert - Dune, Dune Messiah, Children Of Dune, God Emperor Of Dune

The Ultimate in Science Fiction.  Hard science meets existentialist philosophy, religion, eugenics, ecology, passion, love, hate, and above all, POLITICS.

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Non-Fiction:  Edward Bereson; The Trial Of Madame Caillaux

Outstanding account of early 20th century French society and the trouble that one "irrational woman" caused by committing cold-blooded murder.  From the courtroom to the newspapers that covered the crime and trial to the Frenchmen whom Henriette Caillaux enraged, this book exposes the hypocrisy of the male chauvinist Western World.

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#52 Good,bad,andrush

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 08:48 AM

1984 and farenheit 451 are great, but I always thought farenheit was better...I don't know, 1984 is more political and farenheit is more philosophical.  

#53 IChoseFreeWill

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 11:22 AM

The Chronicles of Narnia


Not a popular answer given which forum this is. But let's just say they fit with my beliefs fine.


I listened to 1984 on audiobook. As well as to Dune- this was during a 3 day road trip.  

#54 CMWriter

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 10:29 PM

QUOTE (IChoseFreeWill @ Mar 13 2011, 10:22 AM)
The Chronicles of Narnia


Not a popular answer given which forum this is. But let's just say they fit with my beliefs fine.


I listened to 1984 on audiobook. As well as to Dune- this was during a 3 day road trip.

I love Chronicles of Narnia! yes.gif
I remember my first introduction to it in a Gifted program I was in in.. 4th grade. Absolutely fabulous. Really interesting symbolism in that series, especially the first book, and I think it's a great read in general. C.S. Lewis is a great writer, IMO, and I say that despite my personal beliefs.

#55 skalamander2112

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 12:23 AM

animal farm-orwell
the dharma bums-kerouac
steal this book-hoffman
farenheit 451-bradbury
a scanner darkly-dick
radio free albemuth-dick


way to many to list...

#56 WIDE-ANGLE WATCHER

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 11:58 PM

The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever

By Stephen R. Donaldson

The First Chronicles:
Lord Foul's Bane ♦ The Illearth War ♦ The Power that Preserves

The Second Chronicles:
The Wounded Land ♦ The One Tree ♦ White Gold Wielder

The Last Chronicles:
The Runes of the Earth ♦ Fatal Revenant ♦ Against All Things Ending ♦ The Last Dark


A must read for Fantasy lovers.

A story as powerful as The Lord of The Rings.

Soon to be a major motion picture.


#57 Maverick

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:47 AM

Like most, I'll have to name a few.

To Kill a Mocking Bird - Harper Lee
The Hobbit - Tolkien
Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card
Siddhartha - Hesse
The Great Gatsby - Fitzgerald
2001: A Space Odyssey - Clarke
2010: Odyssey 2 - Clarke
The Prince - Machiavelli
The Republic - Plato
The Killer Angels - Michael Shaara
Gods and Generals - Jeff Shaara

#58 -Jane-

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:41 PM

QUOTE
Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card


WORD

One thing I didn't mention, and I am not sure if I have seen it mentioned here is Steinbecks Grapes of Wrath.
Leaving aside the politics, this an extraordinary book. In fact most of Steinbecks books are wonderful.

#59 Boots

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:36 PM

"Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte

#60 psionic11

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:25 PM

Ah yes, Dune, great mention.  Love the visuals and the plotting.

Jane Eyre has been made into a movie.  My memories of the novel are somewhat meh.  Like Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men.  Required reading in the 80's, and I was probably too immature to realize their greatness.  Still, I'm not inclined to re-visit them, like I don't want to re-visit The Scarlet Letter either.

But somehow, Lord of the Flies still seems to strike a deep chord even nowadays.




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