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#41 PassTheAmmunition

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 03:37 PM

Ahh why did i read this thread?  I was doing fine, my stomach wasnt complaining nor did I feel hungry.  But now?  Damn you Lost In Xanadu.

I havent bbq'd in a few weeks, I've been slacking off.  But I'm gearing up for a bbq/football weekend Oct 9th and I fully intend to make some 3-2-1 apple/cherrywood smoked ribs with a dry rub and finished with a mop of a vinegar-based sweet sauce.   Fall is the best time to smoke, IMO.   Followed immedately by every other time of year, of course

Edited by PassTheAmmunition, 29 September 2011 - 03:38 PM.


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#42 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 03:48 PM

QUOTE (PassTheAmmunition @ Sep 29 2011, 03:37 PM)
Ahh why did i read this thread?  I was doing fine, my stomach wasnt complaining nor did I feel hungry.  But now?  Damn you Lost In Xanadu.

I havent bbq'd in a few weeks, I've been slacking off.  But I'm gearing up for a bbq/football weekend Oct 9th and I fully intend to make some 3-2-1 apple/cherrywood smoked ribs with a dry rub and finished with a mop of a vinegar-based sweet sauce.   Fall is the best time to smoke, IMO.   Followed immedately by every other time of year, of course

3-2-1... what do you mean there?


I like using apple and hickory for BBQ. Pretty much only use cherry for fish or chicken.

I usually rub the meat and refrigerate overnight. I have a water smoker and with BBQ I like putting water, apple juice and cider vinegar in there. With fish I use anything from white wine to just water and lemon.

My standard mop is apple cider, cider vinegar and canola oil.

#43 burgeranacoke

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 06:49 PM

QUOTE (Babycat @ Sep 16 2011, 04:11 PM)
Cornbread sounds good, but I've never seen it. Is it really nice?

I don't like the sound of pumpkins...

Here is a basic cornbread recipe:

    1 3/4 cups cornmeal
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup white sugar
    2 cups buttermilk
    2 eggs
    1/4 cup vegetable oil


buttermilk and vegetable oil can be substituted with milk/butter

the ratio of flower to cornmeal can vary a lot up to 50/50

sugar is not necessary or preferable to many, some like it even sweeter

some people like to moisten it with other things than milk, like creamed corn...

It is popular to put in chiles, cheese, onions.... really any number of things that you want to put in there.  the cornmeal base can carry just about any flavor from sweet to savory.

It is baked like a cake and cut in squares.  It can be fried in hot oil or really old style the mixtured spooned into bacon fat.



As far as BBQ goes, I live in KC and the BBQ sucks IMO, I am not fond of the overly sweet sauces and everyone is going to the "BBQ Federation" standards whatever it is called, which is a bit to undercooked for my taste.  I like the meat on a rib to cooked to the point it is about to fall off the bone.  Texas and Southern BBQ's are more to my taste.

And then... Fried Okra

I grew up on fried okra and I am pretty particular about it,  It is best if okra is fresh but more importantly, it must be pan fried and cooked until the cornmeal all a dark golden brown and just a bit black on the edges.
I have never had good fried okra at a restaurant.

#44 ridertoo98

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 02:00 PM

Andy Nelson's beef brisket /bbq rice/potatoe wedges and sweet tea for lunch...

#45 PassTheAmmunition

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 12:14 PM

QUOTE (Lost In Xanadu @ Sep 29 2011, 03:48 PM)
QUOTE (PassTheAmmunition @ Sep 29 2011, 03:37 PM)
Ahh why did i read this thread?  I was doing fine, my stomach wasnt complaining nor did I feel hungry.  But now?  Damn you Lost In Xanadu.

I havent bbq'd in a few weeks, I've been slacking off.  But I'm gearing up for a bbq/football weekend Oct 9th and I fully intend to make some 3-2-1 apple/cherrywood smoked ribs with a dry rub and finished with a mop of a vinegar-based sweet sauce.   Fall is the best time to smoke, IMO.   Followed immedately by every other time of year, of course

3-2-1... what do you mean there?


I like using apple and hickory for BBQ. Pretty much only use cherry for fish or chicken.

I usually rub the meat and refrigerate overnight. I have a water smoker and with BBQ I like putting water, apple juice and cider vinegar in there. With fish I use anything from white wine to just water and lemon.

My standard mop is apple cider, cider vinegar and canola oil.

Lost in Xanadu -

3-2-1 is just a basic bbq / smoking method that Ive found works really well for ribs.  Its basically just 3 hours of smoke (200 degrees even) and then 2 hours in foil and then 1 hour uncovered for mopping / sauce.  The variations on what you do in terms of rub/no rub, apple juice or vinegar spray, etc are all optional.  The 3 hours is a good rule for smoking though and the foiling really keeps the moisture/flavor from the smoking in and makes it pull from the bones easily, the last stage is whateverr you like to do with sauce or mops.





#46 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 02:51 PM

QUOTE (PassTheAmmunition @ Oct 4 2011, 12:14 PM)
QUOTE (Lost In Xanadu @ Sep 29 2011, 03:48 PM)
QUOTE (PassTheAmmunition @ Sep 29 2011, 03:37 PM)
Ahh why did i read this thread? I was doing fine, my stomach wasnt complaining nor did I feel hungry. But now? Damn you Lost In Xanadu.

I havent bbq'd in a few weeks, I've been slacking off. But I'm gearing up for a bbq/football weekend Oct 9th and I fully intend to make some 3-2-1 apple/cherrywood smoked ribs with a dry rub and finished with a mop of a vinegar-based sweet sauce.  Fall is the best time to smoke, IMO.  Followed immedately by every other time of year, of course

3-2-1... what do you mean there?


I like using apple and hickory for BBQ. Pretty much only use cherry for fish or chicken.

I usually rub the meat and refrigerate overnight. I have a water smoker and with BBQ I like putting water, apple juice and cider vinegar in there. With fish I use anything from white wine to just water and lemon.

My standard mop is apple cider, cider vinegar and canola oil.

Lost in Xanadu -

3-2-1 is just a basic bbq / smoking method that Ive found works really well for ribs.  Its basically just 3 hours of smoke (200 degrees even) and then 2 hours in foil and then 1 hour uncovered for mopping / sauce.  The variations on what you do in terms of rub/no rub, apple juice or vinegar spray, etc are all optional.  The 3 hours is a good rule for smoking though and the foiling really keeps the moisture/flavor from the smoking in and makes it pull from the bones easily, the last stage is whateverr you like to do with sauce or mops.

Yeah, gotcha. I put enough chips in there for 3-5 hours, and then will remove the chips because smoke + wrapped in foil can give a funky taste. I mop and wrap in foil for at least an hour.

#47 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 09:40 AM

Man o man... just made an 8lb brisket yesterday for a family dinner (5 adults, 5 kids) and there was almost nothing left. It was awesome. The more I do it, the better it gets and I learn something new from each time I do it.... gotta do one more before the end of the year smile.gif

#48 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 10:35 AM

QUOTE (Lost In Xanadu @ Nov 7 2011, 09:40 AM)
Man o man... just made an 8lb brisket yesterday for a family dinner (5 adults, 5 kids) and there was almost nothing left. It was awesome. The more I do it, the better it gets and I learn something new from each time I do it.... gotta do one more before the end of the year smile.gif

Just did another one this weekend. Mmmmmm

I did a pork shoulder a couple weeks ago. I am really getting good use out of the smoker this year!


Home Depot has a charcoal sale at the end of the year every year. You can get 2 20lb bags for $8. I bought 8 bags at the end of the year and only have 2 left. Tells you how mild the winter was here in WI.

#49 Thebuckeye2112

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 10:11 PM

My best experience with BBQ was with a restaurant in Lockhart, Texas called Kreuz Market. The restaurant is on Route 183 between Austin and San Antonio. I recommend the Brisket and Sausage both are so flavorful from the BBQ Pit you do not need sauce, also don't ask for forks. Food this simple only requires one's hands or several slices of Texas toast.

#50 Blue Barchetta

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 11:43 PM

There's a little place in Helen, Ga. called North Georgia BBQ.  If you're ever in the vicinity, try it.  You won't be disappointed.

#51 pjbear05

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 12:31 PM

My latest bbq hangout is a place named Smoke off Ocean Boulevard and Oakland Park Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale.  Real deal Texas style.  Outstanding brisket, great cheddar cheese and jalapeno hot links, pulled pork, and ribs. Great coarse cut coleslaw, not that chopped  up watery crap you find in a lot of places.  Only miss is what they call cornbread, because it's more like corn cake, very sweet and fine textured.  I need to get there on a Friday night, as it's the only night that burnt ends are on the menu.  Has a side counter with 4 different sauces and containers of sliced pickles and sweet onions.  Yum!

Edited by pjbear05, 17 September 2017 - 12:32 PM.


#52 goose

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 11:35 PM

Posted Image

Held in Sparks, NV, every Labor Day, this is a great place to sample bbq from across the country.  This year I was invited to a VIP table, which featured and all you can eat buffet of babyback ribs from each of the 30+ vendors.  I ate 24 ribs that night, no two from the same vendor, and each was delicious!

#53 JARG

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 02:03 PM

It may not be there any longer, but there was a BBQ joint in Llano Texas, called Laird's, that had the best BBQ I've ever had (and I grew up in Central Texas, so it's not like good BBQ joints were few and far between).

Here's a write up from 2011:


Quote

During a recent trip to Fredericksburg with my wife Michele, I made sure the backroads route from Dallas included driving through Llano. During the two years the Posse has been visiting and blogging about BBQ, few joints have stirred up as much debate as Cooper’s Old Time Pit Bar-B-Que in Llano. We’ve gotten emails proclaiming it as the best in Texas, while others labeled Cooper’s as an overrated stop for BBQ tourists.
Posse member Michael Hamtil & his wife Lara Solt did extensive comparisons between Cooper’s and Laird’s Bar-B-Q, also in Llano, for their wedding catering a couple of years ago. They were married atop the famous Enchanted Rock north of Fredericksburg and wanted to be sure the BBQ was as amazing as the view from their wedding ceremony setting. They preferred Laird’s hands down and fall in the overrated camp when it comes to Cooper’s. I wanted to check it out for myself.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Atmosphere
Laird’s resides in an old house on Hwy. 16 while Cooper’s is housed in a red steel building on the other main drag in town, Hwy. 29. Both have deer trophies on the wall, paying homage to Llano’s reputation as a deer hunter’s paradise, but otherwise they don’t have much in common. The Laird’s operate out of the kitchen on their old house. The dining room is cobbled out of the dining and living room areas and bathed in window light. We felt like we were eating at our grandmother’s house.
Cooper’s has numerous picnic tables lined end-to-end, enough to seat several hundred diners in the fluorescent lit dining room with red brick painted walls. You line up outside and choose your meats off the warming smoker, then you take the meat on a plastic tray inside where they weigh your meal before paying in another line. It’s very much like Hard Eight BBQ, where the meat is cooked in one smoker and moved to the warming smoker for display purposes.
Advantage: Laird’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

Cooking styles
Both Cooper’s and Laird’s cook with mesquite wood, which is plentiful in this rain-starved part of Texas. Cooper’s cooks over direct heat in numerous brick smokers, fast and hot, before moving the meats to the warming smoker, where you choose your meal. Pitmaster and owner Ken Laird, who once worked at Cooper’s, cooks on a single pit fueled by mesquite coals, which he burns down in a separate firebox. There’s a big difference in the scale of their operations, but their techniques are similar.
Advantage: Cooper’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

The meats
Unfortunately, my wife isn’t as big a fan of BBQ as I am, so we settled on comparing brisket and pork ribs at both places. Cooper’s famous pork chop will have to wait until our next trip, though Posse pitmaster Marshall Cooper calls it “amazing.”
We ordered a two-meat platter from Laird’s, which came with two sides. We also ordered two drinks which made our lunch bill less than $11. Both the pork ribs and brisket were very good, though not what I would call amazing. I thought the ribs were the better of the two, cooked perfectly with nice rub and smoke. The brisket was cooked very well, but a little more bland than the ribs, with a thin bark.
I chatted up two diners, who as it turns out eat at Laird’s at least once a week. When I asked them which joint they preferred, they said Laird’s all the way. One added that the only time he goes to Cooper’s is when out-of-towners make him take them there. “I used to eat there all the time, but once they went all corporate they went downhill,” he said. (Cooper’s has multiple locations including Llano, New Braunfels and a new location in Ft. Worth. The original Cooper’s is west of Llano in Mason, but has different ownership than the other three locations.) Overall, I was impressed with Laird’s and we headed back up Hwy. 16 to Cooper’s.
We stepped up to the pits at Cooper’s and ordered two ribs and 1/2 pound of brisket. We we stepped up to the register, the sticker shock set in as we paid almost $30 for our meat and two drinks. This was nearly three times more than we had paid at Laird’s, though the ribs were slightly bigger. The brisket was tremendous, among the best I’ve tasted on the Texas BBQ trail. It was tender with a great bark and rub, definitely a step up from Laird’s. However, the ribs were a major disappointment. They were slightly undercooked and just looked ugly, not a lot of taste when compared to Laird’s ribs or even their own brisket. All in all, I had to give the slight edge in our unscientific Llano BBQ challenge to Laird’s, especially when you factor in the cost of our meals.
I look forward to making a full-scale assault on Llano in the future with my fellow Posse members. You can’t really judge a BBQ joint by visiting once. Most food critics allow for three visits before assigning a rating to a joint. Not to mention, I want to try that famous pork chop at Cooper’s on my next trip to the deer hunting capital of Texas.
Slight advantage: Laird’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

Photos ©Chris Wilkins/Texas BBQ Posse. On each combo, top photo is Laird’s and bottom photo is Cooper’s


#54 Maverick

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 03:06 PM

View PostJARG, on 18 September 2017 - 02:03 PM, said:

It may not be there any longer, but there was a BBQ joint in Llano Texas, called Laird's, that had the best BBQ I've ever had (and I grew up in Central Texas, so it's not like good BBQ joints were few and far between).

Here's a write up from 2011:


Quote

During a recent trip to Fredericksburg with my wife Michele, I made sure the backroads route from Dallas included driving through Llano. During the two years the Posse has been visiting and blogging about BBQ, few joints have stirred up as much debate as Cooper’s Old Time Pit Bar-B-Que in Llano. We’ve gotten emails proclaiming it as the best in Texas, while others labeled Cooper’s as an overrated stop for BBQ tourists.
Posse member Michael Hamtil & his wife Lara Solt did extensive comparisons between Cooper’s and Laird’s Bar-B-Q, also in Llano, for their wedding catering a couple of years ago. They were married atop the famous Enchanted Rock north of Fredericksburg and wanted to be sure the BBQ was as amazing as the view from their wedding ceremony setting. They preferred Laird’s hands down and fall in the overrated camp when it comes to Cooper’s. I wanted to check it out for myself.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Atmosphere
Laird’s resides in an old house on Hwy. 16 while Cooper’s is housed in a red steel building on the other main drag in town, Hwy. 29. Both have deer trophies on the wall, paying homage to Llano’s reputation as a deer hunter’s paradise, but otherwise they don’t have much in common. The Laird’s operate out of the kitchen on their old house. The dining room is cobbled out of the dining and living room areas and bathed in window light. We felt like we were eating at our grandmother’s house.
Cooper’s has numerous picnic tables lined end-to-end, enough to seat several hundred diners in the fluorescent lit dining room with red brick painted walls. You line up outside and choose your meats off the warming smoker, then you take the meat on a plastic tray inside where they weigh your meal before paying in another line. It’s very much like Hard Eight BBQ, where the meat is cooked in one smoker and moved to the warming smoker for display purposes.
Advantage: Laird’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

Cooking styles
Both Cooper’s and Laird’s cook with mesquite wood, which is plentiful in this rain-starved part of Texas. Cooper’s cooks over direct heat in numerous brick smokers, fast and hot, before moving the meats to the warming smoker, where you choose your meal. Pitmaster and owner Ken Laird, who once worked at Cooper’s, cooks on a single pit fueled by mesquite coals, which he burns down in a separate firebox. There’s a big difference in the scale of their operations, but their techniques are similar.
Advantage: Cooper’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

The meats
Unfortunately, my wife isn’t as big a fan of BBQ as I am, so we settled on comparing brisket and pork ribs at both places. Cooper’s famous pork chop will have to wait until our next trip, though Posse pitmaster Marshall Cooper calls it “amazing.”
We ordered a two-meat platter from Laird’s, which came with two sides. We also ordered two drinks which made our lunch bill less than $11. Both the pork ribs and brisket were very good, though not what I would call amazing. I thought the ribs were the better of the two, cooked perfectly with nice rub and smoke. The brisket was cooked very well, but a little more bland than the ribs, with a thin bark.
I chatted up two diners, who as it turns out eat at Laird’s at least once a week. When I asked them which joint they preferred, they said Laird’s all the way. One added that the only time he goes to Cooper’s is when out-of-towners make him take them there. “I used to eat there all the time, but once they went all corporate they went downhill,” he said. (Cooper’s has multiple locations including Llano, New Braunfels and a new location in Ft. Worth. The original Cooper’s is west of Llano in Mason, but has different ownership than the other three locations.) Overall, I was impressed with Laird’s and we headed back up Hwy. 16 to Cooper’s.
We stepped up to the pits at Cooper’s and ordered two ribs and 1/2 pound of brisket. We we stepped up to the register, the sticker shock set in as we paid almost $30 for our meat and two drinks. This was nearly three times more than we had paid at Laird’s, though the ribs were slightly bigger. The brisket was tremendous, among the best I’ve tasted on the Texas BBQ trail. It was tender with a great bark and rub, definitely a step up from Laird’s. However, the ribs were a major disappointment. They were slightly undercooked and just looked ugly, not a lot of taste when compared to Laird’s ribs or even their own brisket. All in all, I had to give the slight edge in our unscientific Llano BBQ challenge to Laird’s, especially when you factor in the cost of our meals.
I look forward to making a full-scale assault on Llano in the future with my fellow Posse members. You can’t really judge a BBQ joint by visiting once. Most food critics allow for three visits before assigning a rating to a joint. Not to mention, I want to try that famous pork chop at Cooper’s on my next trip to the deer hunting capital of Texas.
Slight advantage: Laird’s

Posted Image


Posted Image

Photos ©Chris Wilkins/Texas BBQ Posse. On each combo, top photo is Laird’s and bottom photo is Cooper’s


JAR-BQ




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