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#21 thesweetscience

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 05:33 PM

View PostLorraine, on 22 December 2019 - 04:48 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 01:21 PM, said:

Oh and the house smells amazing!
I'm sure it does.   Send me over a dozen when done.  ;)
She only made 9 dozen today.  I have a feeling she isn't finished yet.  There are still 3 days until Christmas.

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#22 Lorraine

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 08:38 PM

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 05:33 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 22 December 2019 - 04:48 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 01:21 PM, said:

Oh and the house smells amazing!
I'm sure it does.   Send me over a dozen when done.  ;)
She only made 9 dozen today.  I have a feeling she isn't finished yet.  There are still 3 days until Christmas.

Does she make up little gift boxes and give them as gifts?

#23 thesweetscience

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 10:19 AM

View PostLorraine, on 22 December 2019 - 08:38 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 05:33 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 22 December 2019 - 04:48 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 01:21 PM, said:

Oh and the house smells amazing!
I'm sure it does.   Send me over a dozen when done.  ;)
She only made 9 dozen today.  I have a feeling she isn't finished yet.  There are still 3 days until Christmas.

Does she make up little gift boxes and give them as gifts?
Not really. She puts them in Tupperware and we take them to work and parties and such.  She has them all divided up.

We are not traditionalists when it comes to Christmas.  We don't give gifts.  We don't even put up a tree.  But we like cookies so we take them to every gathering we go too from Thanksgiving through New Years.

#24 pjbear05

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 07:10 PM

When my father was still alive the holidays brought two major food projects that I assited on.  One was four different batches of cookies:  Chocolate chip, peanut butter, lebkuchen (a spicy cookie laden with dried fruits), and one alternately called Russian Teacakes or Mexican Wedding cakes (small half dome cookies rich with buttter and finely ground almonds.

The other project? Home made, ground, and stuffed, fresh kielbasa.

#25 goose

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 01:26 AM

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 01:20 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 19 December 2019 - 09:16 AM, said:

Baking is science.  There's things you just can't do (like over-softening the butter) without changing the outcome.  My wife makes hockey pucks.  Flat, stiff.  At least the taste good, though.  :lol:

My wife was reading this thread and she says she melts her butter all the way to liquid.  Also she never uses unsalted butter even if a recipe calls for it.
Hmmm...  How does she get the to keep shape?

#26 goose

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 01:28 AM

View Postpjbear05, on 23 December 2019 - 07:10 PM, said:

Russian Teacakes or Mexican Wedding cakes
I love those!

#27 pjbear05

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 10:17 AM

View Postgoose, on 19 December 2019 - 09:16 AM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 19 December 2019 - 12:25 AM, said:

View Postgoose, on 18 December 2019 - 09:59 AM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 December 2019 - 11:15 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 17 December 2019 - 04:52 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 December 2019 - 02:29 PM, said:

My wife has dozens of very creative and in some instances, simply amazing cookie recipes.

Salted caramel chocolate chip
Oatmeal Craisin walnut
Triple chocolate.
Chocolate peanut butter chip.
Some other ones I couldn't even tell you the ingredients for.

No way I could go low carb right now.
Can you ask her for the salted caramel chocolate chip and the chocolate peanut butter chip recipes?

Better yet -  here - show her these recipes and ask her if either or both look close to the one she uses:

https://www.allrecip...e-chip-cookies/


https://cookiesandcu...r-chip-cookies/
She says she doesn't write them down.

She says she uses more vanilla than recipes call for and more brown sugar less white sugar then recipes call for.

Other that that its all about what type of flavored chips she wants to put in it.

Also she says don't over mix or bake too long.
Tell my wife that last bit, lol.
Over mixing makes them tougher and they dry out faster.  under bake them by a minute or two and they stay soft and chewy.

My wife makes the best cookies ever.
Lucky man.


Baking is science.  There's things you just can't do (like over-softening the butter) without changing the outcome.  My wife makes hockey pucks.  Flat, stiff.  At least the taste good, though.  :lol:
Usually a recipe says "cream butter and sugar", which means beating, not merely combining.  You want it light, with a lot of air incorporated.  Break out the mixer.

#28 thesweetscience

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 01:15 PM

View Postgoose, on 25 December 2019 - 01:26 AM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 22 December 2019 - 01:20 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 19 December 2019 - 09:16 AM, said:

Baking is science.  There's things you just can't do (like over-softening the butter) without changing the outcome.  My wife makes hockey pucks.  Flat, stiff.  At least the taste good, though.  :lol:

My wife was reading this thread and she says she melts her butter all the way to liquid.  Also she never uses unsalted butter even if a recipe calls for it.
Hmmm...  How does she get the to keep shape?
I don't know.  They just do.

#29 Lorraine

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 07:44 PM

View Postpjbear05, on 23 December 2019 - 07:10 PM, said:

When my father was still alive the holidays brought two major food projects that I assited on.  One was four different batches of cookies:  Chocolate chip, peanut butter, lebkuchen (a spicy cookie laden with dried fruits), and one alternately called Russian Teacakes or Mexican Wedding cakes (small half dome cookies rich with buttter and finely ground almonds.

The other project? Home made, ground, and stuffed, fresh kielbasa.

If I could afford it, I'd have you overnight FedEx one of your home-made kielbasa to me.

My grandmother used to  make her own, and one year my mother did as well.

#30 pjbear05

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 10:26 PM

View PostLorraine, on 25 December 2019 - 07:44 PM, said:

View Postpjbear05, on 23 December 2019 - 07:10 PM, said:

When my father was still alive the holidays brought two major food projects that I assited on.  One was four different batches of cookies:  Chocolate chip, peanut butter, lebkuchen (a spicy cookie laden with dried fruits), and one alternately called Russian Teacakes or Mexican Wedding cakes (small half dome cookies rich with buttter and finely ground almonds.

The other project? Home made, ground, and stuffed, fresh kielbasa.

If I could afford it, I'd have you overnight FedEx one of your home-made kielbasa to me.

My grandmother used to  make her own, and one year my mother did as well.
OMG, the kielbasa making was way back, last time I remember doing so was in '83, and I was still living in Detroit back then.

#31 Lorraine

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 02:40 PM

View Postpjbear05, on 25 December 2019 - 10:26 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 25 December 2019 - 07:44 PM, said:

View Postpjbear05, on 23 December 2019 - 07:10 PM, said:

When my father was still alive the holidays brought two major food projects that I assited on.  One was four different batches of cookies:  Chocolate chip, peanut butter, lebkuchen (a spicy cookie laden with dried fruits), and one alternately called Russian Teacakes or Mexican Wedding cakes (small half dome cookies rich with buttter and finely ground almonds.

The other project? Home made, ground, and stuffed, fresh kielbasa.

If I could afford it, I'd have you overnight FedEx one of your home-made kielbasa to me.

My grandmother used to  make her own, and one year my mother did as well.
OMG, the kielbasa making was way back, last time I remember doing so was in '83, and I was still living in Detroit back then.

Never mind then.  :)

:lol:

By the way, Detroit was a beautiful city back in the day.

Edited by Lorraine, 26 December 2019 - 02:41 PM.


#32 Mara

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 09:55 PM

Bumping because I love to bake!  It's funny, though, I don't eat much of what I bake.  If it's cake, I might have a slice or two and then my SO gets tasked with finishing the rest.  I made a German chocolate cake recently, which is his favorite. Half of it went in the freezer.  He commented that I hadn't eaten any, not knowing that I actually hate German chocolate cake.  It's the coconut and pecan filling - too much stuff and I really, really do not like nuts.  But it was an enormous cake, three layers with the trademark filling and then chocolate frosting.  He loved it, asked me to make one to take when we visit his family in a couple of months, but it was too much for one guy!

Cookies I can eat a few more of; I made peanut butter blossoms for Christmas gifts (those are the cookies with the Hershey's Kisses stuck in the center).  8 dozen total and we didn't give any away, sorrynotsorry.

I think I went through 5 lbs of butter in December and maybe 2 dozen eggs.  Always unsalted, because most recipes call for salt and no, I do not go for salted sweet anything.  I can taste the damn salt and it ruins it for me.  I'm with thesweetscience's wife on altering sugar ratios, though.  Unless I am trying a new recipe, I always sub in brown sugar for about half of the white stuff.

#33 1-0-0-1-0-0-1

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Posted 11 November 2020 - 02:57 PM

I had originally posted this in the Desserts thread, but Lorraine just asked about it so I thought I'd put it in here where it might be easier to find. For those who have used this recipe after I first posted it, I've since modded it.



Easy Peanut Butter Cookies

Easy because they only have three ingredients (four if you add chocolate chips), and there's no measuring (unless you add the chips). The peanut butter HAS to be the natural kind, you know, the kind with the oil on top. Regular Jif or Peter Pan or whatever will be too hard to mix.

1 - 16oz jar of natural peanut butter (crunchy or smooth)
16oz of sugar. Regular sugar or turbinado (Sugar In The Raw, for instance) -- either or both works just fine. Turbinado adds a little molasses flavor.
2 eggs
1/3 cup chocolate chips (optional)

--------------------------------------------

Preheat oven to 350.

In a large mixing bowl, scoop out the entire jar of peanut butter.

Use the empty PB jar to measure out the sugar -- fill the jar up to about the level where the peanut butter was, not all the way to the top. You can use less sugar if you want.

In a separate bowl, pour in sugar, eggs and (if you're using them) chocolate chips. Mix thoroughly.

Add the egg-sugar-chips mixture to the peanut butter. Mix ingredients together using a large sturdy spoon. The mixing gets tougher as you go. Keep mixing until you have a firm and thoroughly mixed cookie dough.

Line a large cookie sheet with parchment paper, if desired (or, see below).

Using your hands, take some dough and roll it into a ball, then press your hands together to flatten the ball into a cookie-like shape. How big you make the cookies is up to you, but the dough will flatten and spread out only a little bit as they bake. You can use a fork to press a crisscross pattern into the top of the cookie if you like -- do this before you place it on the sheet (less stickage).

Bake at 350 for 14-15 minutes. Cookies should be light tan on top and brown on the bottom -- they'll darken a bit as they cool off. Give them time to cool before trying to take them off of the sheet.

If you don't want to use parchment paper or non-stick spray, here's a tip for less stickage to the cookie sheet. Take a shallow bowl and put in some uncooked oats. After you flatten the dough in your hands, place it in the oats and press down a bit, embedding the oats into the bottom of the cookie. You can do this with the fork in a crisscross pattern. The oats on the bottom make the cookies easier to remove from the cookie sheet. Again, wait for the cookies to cool somewhat before removing them.

#34 Lorraine

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 11:47 PM

View Post1-0-0-1-0-0-1, on 11 November 2020 - 02:57 PM, said:

I had originally posted this in the Desserts thread, but Lorraine just asked about it so I thought I'd put it in here where it might be easier to find. For those who have used this recipe after I first posted it, I've since modded it.



Easy Peanut Butter Cookies

Easy because they only have three ingredients (four if you add chocolate chips), and there's no measuring (unless you add the chips). The peanut butter HAS to be the natural kind, you know, the kind with the oil on top. Regular Jif or Peter Pan or whatever will be too hard to mix.

1 - 16oz jar of natural peanut butter (crunchy or smooth)
16oz of sugar. Regular sugar or turbinado (Sugar In The Raw, for instance) -- either or both works just fine. Turbinado adds a little molasses flavor.
2 eggs
1/3 cup chocolate chips (optional)

--------------------------------------------

Preheat oven to 350.

In a large mixing bowl, scoop out the entire jar of peanut butter.

Use the empty PB jar to measure out the sugar -- fill the jar up to about the level where the peanut butter was, not all the way to the top. You can use less sugar if you want.

In a separate bowl, pour in sugar, eggs and (if you're using them) chocolate chips. Mix thoroughly.

Add the egg-sugar-chips mixture to the peanut butter. Mix ingredients together using a large sturdy spoon. The mixing gets tougher as you go. Keep mixing until you have a firm and thoroughly mixed cookie dough.

Line a large cookie sheet with parchment paper, if desired (or, see below).

Using your hands, take some dough and roll it into a ball, then press your hands together to flatten the ball into a cookie-like shape. How big you make the cookies is up to you, but the dough will flatten and spread out only a little bit as they bake. You can use a fork to press a crisscross pattern into the top of the cookie if you like -- do this before you place it on the sheet (less stickage).

Bake at 350 for 14-15 minutes. Cookies should be light tan on top and brown on the bottom -- they'll darken a bit as they cool off. Give them time to cool before trying to take them off of the sheet.

If you don't want to use parchment paper or non-stick spray, here's a tip for less stickage to the cookie sheet. Take a shallow bowl and put in some uncooked oats. After you flatten the dough in your hands, place it in the oats and press down a bit, embedding the oats into the bottom of the cookie. You can do this with the fork in a crisscross pattern. The oats on the bottom make the cookies easier to remove from the cookie sheet. Again, wait for the cookies to cool somewhat before removing them.

The cookies are the best!




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