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Gluten Free - Anyone have good/bad results???


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#1 alphseeker

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:09 PM

I've been suffering from severe arthritis and i've decided to go gluten free to see if it reduces inflammation of my joints?

Have any of you gone gluten-free or attempted it?

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#2 treeduck

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:26 PM

My dad went gluten-free about 7 years ago. He'd lost three stone (42 pounds) in just a few weeks and had a whole load of other symptoms. They discovered it was the gluten in his diet, it did something to the intestines (the villi?) and all the food he ate just washed right through his body without him getting any of the nutrients, thus the weight loss. Once he went gluten-free he went back to normal pretty quickly.

#3 Narps

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:40 PM

I have never gone gluten - free but I do have I guess what is considered pretty bad arthritis. Had bone fusion surgery on my right hand due to the arthritis there. Never heard of this to help but that doesn't mean much coming from me. I haven't heard of alot of things. Is this supposed to help somehow? Losing 40 pounds and getting in shape has helped my arthritis it seems all over my body... :huh:

#4 KennyLee

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:49 PM

The wife of a co-worker of mine recently went gluten free as they thought her constant illness and pain could be a gluten allergy. She felt better almost immediately. She never looked back and has been feeling great for the past 4 months.

I would say trying it for a week will tell you what you need to know.

#5 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:15 PM

There have been studies that show gluten and dairy can cause inflammation and even flare ups for rheumatoid arthritis. It's worth a try I'd say to eliminate both and see if the pain gets less. Also try upping your intake of magnesium that helps with muscular pain which is one of the symptoms that cause the grinding on the joints.

Best thing to do is to keep active.
Hope this helps.

#6 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:21 PM

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 17 March 2014 - 03:15 PM, said:

There have been studies that show gluten and dairy can cause inflammation and even flare ups for rheumatoid arthritis. It's worth a try I'd say to eliminate both and see if the pain gets less. Also try upping your intake of magnesium that helps with muscular pain which is one of the symptoms that cause the grinding on the joints.

Best thing to do is to keep active.
Hope this helps.
I have not gone gluten free, but am pretty much dairy free (which is hard being in WI) and I am doing much better as far as pain goes. I still have cheese on my pizza, but I drink almond milk now.

#7 thesweetscience

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:45 PM

Maybe I need to look at trying this for a while.  I cut out dairy and I feel a little better but I still have issues.  It's almost as if there is nothing that I can eat these days.

#8 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:58 PM

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 03:45 PM, said:

Maybe I need to look at trying this for a while.  I cut out dairy and I feel a little better but I still have issues.  It's almost as if there is nothing that I can eat these days.
I'm in the same boat TSS. Hence Im going mostly raw and vegan for a lil while.
I've found a recipe that calls for cashew nut cheese that im making tonight. If it turns out good i'll share the recipe... I drink almond milk too.

#9 Chicken hawk

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 04:08 PM

Im trying Gluton Free wild rice tonight as a matter of fact. When i bought it..i didnt even notice.

Edited by Chicken hawk, 17 March 2014 - 04:08 PM.


#10 thesweetscience

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 04:20 PM

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 17 March 2014 - 03:58 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 03:45 PM, said:

Maybe I need to look at trying this for a while.  I cut out dairy and I feel a little better but I still have issues.  It's almost as if there is nothing that I can eat these days.
I'm in the same boat TSS. Hence Im going mostly raw and vegan for a lil while.
I've found a recipe that calls for cashew nut cheese that im making tonight. If it turns out good i'll share the recipe... I drink almond milk too.
I can't eat nuts.

I have a hard time getting protein. I work out religiously and with great conviction.  I love salad and fresh fruits and berries but I depended on dairy, quinoa and oats for protein to supplement the eggs and meats that I eat. I have ditched dairy and if I have to ditch grains too then what the f**k.  I love food but it just seems that I can eat most of it anymore and with my workout regimen, I have a very hard time getting enough calories.   I just want to throw myself off a bridge.

#11 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:03 PM

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 04:20 PM, said:

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 17 March 2014 - 03:58 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 03:45 PM, said:

Maybe I need to look at trying this for a while.  I cut out dairy and I feel a little better but I still have issues.  It's almost as if there is nothing that I can eat these days.
I'm in the same boat TSS. Hence Im going mostly raw and vegan for a lil while.
I've found a recipe that calls for cashew nut cheese that im making tonight. If it turns out good i'll share the recipe... I drink almond milk too.
I can't eat nuts.

I have a hard time getting protein. I work out religiously and with great conviction.  I love salad and fresh fruits and berries but I depended on dairy, quinoa and oats for protein to supplement the eggs and meats that I eat. I have ditched dairy and if I have to ditch grains too then what the f**k.  I love food but it just seems that I can eat most of it anymore and with my workout regimen, I have a very hard time getting enough calories.   I just want to throw myself off a bridge.
Can you eat hemp seeds? Chia Seeds are LOADED with protein and you dont need that much for a daily dose. Wheatgrass juice may taste like ass but do it like a shot of booze and you will get LOADS of protein. Goji berries, maca powder, bee pollen... they are loaded with nutrients and are easy to just toss in a smoothie or salad.  You will find that eating those foods along with veggies and fruits you will have enough energy for your workouts and to live happily.

Also try eating sprouts... they are LOADED with nutrients for absorption. I'm just starting to get to know them myself.

I can't wait to have my gut stabilized... i can feel stuff happening in there already and it's only day 2 of eating mostly raw.

Edited by Ya_Big_Tree, 17 March 2014 - 05:04 PM.


#12 thesweetscience

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:05 PM

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 17 March 2014 - 05:03 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 04:20 PM, said:

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 17 March 2014 - 03:58 PM, said:

View Postthesweetscience, on 17 March 2014 - 03:45 PM, said:

Maybe I need to look at trying this for a while.  I cut out dairy and I feel a little better but I still have issues.  It's almost as if there is nothing that I can eat these days.
I'm in the same boat TSS. Hence Im going mostly raw and vegan for a lil while.
I've found a recipe that calls for cashew nut cheese that im making tonight. If it turns out good i'll share the recipe... I drink almond milk too.
I can't eat nuts.

I have a hard time getting protein. I work out religiously and with great conviction.  I love salad and fresh fruits and berries but I depended on dairy, quinoa and oats for protein to supplement the eggs and meats that I eat. I have ditched dairy and if I have to ditch grains too then what the f**k.  I love food but it just seems that I can eat most of it anymore and with my workout regimen, I have a very hard time getting enough calories.   I just want to throw myself off a bridge.
Can you eat hemp seeds? Chia Seeds are LOADED with protein and you dont need that much for a daily dose. Wheatgrass juice may taste like ass but do it like a shot of booze and you will get LOADS of protein. Goji berries, maca powder, bee pollen... they are loaded with nutrients and are easy to just toss in a smoothie or salad.  You will find that eating those foods along with veggies and fruits you will have enough energy for your workouts and to live happily.

Also try eating sprouts... they are LOADED with nutrients for absorption. I'm just starting to get to know them myself.

I can't wait to have my gut stabilized... i can feel stuff happening in there already and it's only day 2 of eating mostly raw.
No nuts or seeds.

#13 1-0-0-1-0-0-1

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:15 PM

View Posttreeduck, on 17 March 2014 - 02:26 PM, said:

My dad went gluten-free about 7 years ago. He'd lost three stone (42 pounds) in just a few weeks and had a whole load of other symptoms. They discovered it was the gluten in his diet, it did something to the intestines (the villi?) and all the food he ate just washed right through his body without him getting any of the nutrients, thus the weight loss. Once he went gluten-free he went back to normal pretty quickly.

Correct.

I'm not proficient in medical speak, but in layman's terms, gluten wears down the villi in your intestines, and those villi are largely what absorbs the nutrients in food. And since today's wheat is engineered to have extra gluten -- gluten makes breads and baked goods softer and moister -- the villi are under more attack than in years past. The villi wears down, you pass vital nutrients out instead of absorbing them, and in some cases, your gut gets inflamed.

The good news is, if you eliminate or sharply curb your gluten intake, the villi can grow back. The damage is reversible.

A few years ago the 33" waist pants I've worn most of my adult life weren't fitting me anymore. I thought, maybe it was just normal weight gain from getting older, or maybe it was something else. A couple of people in my family were already gluten-free, so I gave it a shot. I eliminated about 90% of gluten in my diet, and within a couple of months I lost a couple of inches around my waist, and my pants were fitting me again. I suspect those added inches were from a bloated gut.

#14 An Enemy Without

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:29 PM

No, but one of my friends is allergic and I have to say its a real pain in the ass for him.

#15 treeduck

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:29 PM

View Post1-0-0-1-0-0-1, on 17 March 2014 - 06:15 PM, said:

View Posttreeduck, on 17 March 2014 - 02:26 PM, said:

My dad went gluten-free about 7 years ago. He'd lost three stone (42 pounds) in just a few weeks and had a whole load of other symptoms. They discovered it was the gluten in his diet, it did something to the intestines (the villi?) and all the food he ate just washed right through his body without him getting any of the nutrients, thus the weight loss. Once he went gluten-free he went back to normal pretty quickly.

Correct.

I'm not proficient in medical speak, but in layman's terms, gluten wears down the villi in your intestines, and those villi are largely what absorbs the nutrients in food. And since today's wheat is engineered to have extra gluten -- gluten makes breads and baked goods softer and moister -- the villi are under more attack than in years past. The villi wears down, you pass vital nutrients out instead of absorbing them, and in some cases, your gut gets inflamed.

The good news is, if you eliminate or sharply curb your gluten intake, the villi can grow back. The damage is reversible.

A few years ago the 33" waist pants I've worn most of my adult life weren't fitting me anymore. I thought, maybe it was just normal weight gain from getting older, or maybe it was something else. A couple of people in my family were already gluten-free, so I gave it a shot. I eliminated about 90% of gluten in my diet, and within a couple of months I lost a couple of inches around my waist, and my pants were fitting me again. I suspect those added inches were from a bloated gut.

Yeah it can affect you in different ways depending on what you eat exactly and how much of it. My dad recovered well and is fine now and no lasting ill-effects.

It's funny how we never heard of any of this back in the 70's and 80's. Why has gluten become such a big problem today? Or was it just an unknown illness back then?

Edited by treeduck, 17 March 2014 - 06:30 PM.


#16 alphseeker

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:59 PM

View Posttreeduck, on 17 March 2014 - 06:29 PM, said:

View Post1-0-0-1-0-0-1, on 17 March 2014 - 06:15 PM, said:

View Posttreeduck, on 17 March 2014 - 02:26 PM, said:

My dad went gluten-free about 7 years ago. He'd lost three stone (42 pounds) in just a few weeks and had a whole load of other symptoms. They discovered it was the gluten in his diet, it did something to the intestines (the villi?) and all the food he ate just washed right through his body without him getting any of the nutrients, thus the weight loss. Once he went gluten-free he went back to normal pretty quickly.

Correct.

I'm not proficient in medical speak, but in layman's terms, gluten wears down the villi in your intestines, and those villi are largely what absorbs the nutrients in food. And since today's wheat is engineered to have extra gluten -- gluten makes breads and baked goods softer and moister -- the villi are under more attack than in years past. The villi wears down, you pass vital nutrients out instead of absorbing them, and in some cases, your gut gets inflamed.

The good news is, if you eliminate or sharply curb your gluten intake, the villi can grow back. The damage is reversible.

A few years ago the 33" waist pants I've worn most of my adult life weren't fitting me anymore. I thought, maybe it was just normal weight gain from getting older, or maybe it was something else. A couple of people in my family were already gluten-free, so I gave it a shot. I eliminated about 90% of gluten in my diet, and within a couple of months I lost a couple of inches around my waist, and my pants were fitting me again. I suspect those added inches were from a bloated gut.

Yeah it can affect you in different ways depending on what you eat exactly and how much of it. My dad recovered well and is fine now and no lasting ill-effects.

It's funny how we never heard of any of this back in the 70's and 80's. Why has gluten become such a big problem today? Or was it just an unknown illness back then?
The government’s push toward whole grain breads, although well-intended, has resulted in a whole generation of  people eating extra gluten. Any whole wheat bread in the store, and many good whole wheat bread recipes, include additional gluten over and above that which is already in the wheat.  There is also a theory that perhaps are there is a limit gluten load that their bodies can handle in a lifetime and
after it reaches that state the breakdown begins.

#17 bathory

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:18 PM

hope I die before I get old

#18 treeduck

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:49 PM

View Postbathory, on 17 March 2014 - 07:18 PM, said:

hope I die before I get old


#19 Mara

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 08:48 PM

Celiac disease is not as common as the recent gluten free craze would lead some to believe.  People who really have celiac disease don't just get a little bloated or feel "off" if they eat gluten - they get seriously, agonizingly ill.

Of course there's more than a little credence to gluten free=improved health; eliminating gluten from your diet means wiping out an awful lot of stuff that's mostly empty calories anyway.  And a lot of it contains sugar (most baked goods, for example).  The typical American diet contains far too much refined sugar and non-structured (low nutritional value, high glycemic) carbohydrates anyway.

In some ways I think the gluten-free thing has become a fad; some people are so incredibly extremist about it!  But overall most people could stand to clean up their diets, so I think the good definitely negates the bad.

*I do have a co-worker who I sometimes am tempted to beat senseless with a hardcover edition of the Wheat Belly book, especially on the two occasions when she heated up fish in the break room microwave.  She's so preachy about how clean she eats, but she's been carrying around the same excess 25 lbs or so ever since she started working for us over a year ago.  The people in her section love to torment her by having Cake Fridays - every Friday someone brings in a big ass decadent cake.

#20 1-0-0-1-0-0-1

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:24 AM

View PostMara, on 17 March 2014 - 08:48 PM, said:

Celiac disease is not as common as the recent gluten free craze would lead some to believe.  People who really have celiac disease don't just get a little bloated or feel "off" if they eat gluten - they get seriously, agonizingly ill.

Of course there's more than a little credence to gluten free=improved health; eliminating gluten from your diet means wiping out an awful lot of stuff that's mostly empty calories anyway.  And a lot of it contains sugar (most baked goods, for example).  The typical American diet contains far too much refined sugar and non-structured (low nutritional value, high glycemic) carbohydrates anyway.

In some ways I think the gluten-free thing has become a fad; some people are so incredibly extremist about it!  But overall most people could stand to clean up their diets, so I think the good definitely negates the bad.

You can have a sensitivity to gluten, and have a little bloating in your gut, without having full-blown Celiac. I wasn't eating a lot of breads and cakes and stuff when I started gaining a few inches around my waist a few years back. I'd been eating healthy for years. My bread of choice at the time was Ezekiel, which is an organic whole grain and flourless bread. It's as healthy a bread as you'll find -- no preservatives, minimally processed, lots of protein -- but it's probably quite glutenous. Alphseeker's comment about the increased consumption of whole grains resulting in increased gluten intake, coupled with today's wheat being bred to contain more gluten, makes a lot of sense.

Some people go their whole lives eating Wonder bread and cookies and frozen dinners and live till they're 90. Some people have no problem processing gluten, but some do, and to varying degrees. Everybody reacts to this stuff differently.




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