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Yarn Crochet Knitting Weaves Crafts DIY

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#21 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 10:48 AM

View PostLyndseyG, on 11 March 2013 - 02:56 PM, said:

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 10 March 2013 - 11:41 PM, said:

Here's a few things I made recently...
Posted Image
Fall Tam I made last autumn... all knit

Posted Image
Lace scarf I knit last fall... gave to a friend for a gift

Working on a crochet project currently... will be posting pics of the progress as it comes along.

Anyone else wanna post pics?

Nice!!

Here's mine:

And lo, a blanket is born...

Posted Image

Sorry about the quality of the image. I'll post more as it grows...
I love those colours together! Great start!
I'm also making a blanket currently... Im crocheting it though. Im making a bunch of squares then Im going to attach them together in a blanket for my boyfriend... then Im making a totally psychedelic throw for myself. :D

Edited by Ya_Big_Tree, 12 March 2013 - 10:49 AM.


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#22 LyndseyG

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:41 PM

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 11 March 2013 - 03:19 PM, said:

In securing the previous stitch in a wale, the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from either below or above. If the former, the stitch is denoted as a knit stitch or a plain stitch; if the latter, as a purl stitch. The two stitches are related in that a knit stitch seen from one side of the fabric appears as a purl stitch on the other side.

I love knitting terminology...it's so fun to just know the terms...maybe I'll use them in a crossword puzzle someday

I'll be honest, none of that made any sense... I am a bit sleepy though. :)

#23 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:41 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 11 March 2013 - 03:19 PM, said:

In securing the previous stitch in a wale, the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from either below or above. If the former, the stitch is denoted as a knit stitch or a plain stitch; if the latter, as a purl stitch. The two stitches are related in that a knit stitch seen from one side of the fabric appears as a purl stitch on the other side.

I love knitting terminology...it's so fun to just know the terms...maybe I'll use them in a crossword puzzle someday

I'll be honest, none of that made any sense... I am a bit sleepy though. :)
Here let me help you out. I'm just going to start documenting really cool aspects, and basic aspects of knitting. The terminilogy really makes me laugh...like how did someone come up with these terms for knitting? I'll just start with this entry, courtesy of Wiki:

[edit] Courses and wales


Posted Image

Posted ImageStructure of stockinette, a common knitted fabric. The meandering red path defines one course, the path of the yarn through the fabric. The uppermost white loops are unsecured and "active", but they secure the red loops suspended from them. In turn, the red loops secure the white loops just below them, which in turn secure the loops below them, and so on.

Posted Image

Posted ImageAlternating wales of red and white knit stitches. Each stitch in a wale is suspended from the one above it.
Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. In weaving, threads are always straight, running parallel either lengthwise (warp threads) or crosswise (weft threads). By contrast, the yarn in knitted fabrics follows a meandering path (a course), forming symmetric loops (also called bights) symmetrically above and below the mean path of the yarn. These meandering loops can be stretched easily in different directions, which gives knitting much more elasticity than woven fabrics; depending on the yarn and knitting pattern, knitted garments can stretch as much as 500%. For this reason, knitting was initially developed for garments that must be elastic or stretch in response to the wearer's motions, such as socks and hosiery. For comparison, woven garments stretch mainly along one direction (the bias) and are not very elastic, unless they are woven from stretchable material such as spandex. Knitted garments are often more form-fitting than woven garments, since their elasticity allows them to follow the body's curvature closely; by contrast, curvature is introduced into most woven garments only with sewn darts, flares, gussets and gores, the seams of which lower the elasticity of the woven fabric still further. Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. Thread used in weaving is usually much finer than the yarn used in knitting, which can give the knitted fabric more bulk and less drape than a woven fabric.
If they are not secured, the loops of a knitted course will come undone when their yarn is pulled; this is known as ripping out, unravelling knitting, or humorously, frogging (because you 'rip it', this sounds like a frog croaking: 'rib-bit').[1] To secure a stitch, at least one new loop is passed through it. Although the new stitch is itself unsecured ("active" or "live"), it secures the stitch(es) suspended from it. A sequence of stitches in which each stitch is suspended from the next is called a wale.[2] To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding off. During knitting, the active stitches are secured mechanically, either from individual hooks (in knitting machines) or from a knitting needle or frame in hand-knitting.

#24 treeduck

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM

What is a yarnie? :wtf:

is it a knitting freak?

#25 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:50 PM

View Posttreeduck, on 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM, said:

What is a yarnie? :wtf:

is it a knitting freak?
Spot on young duckster

#26 treeduck

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:54 PM

Well obviously Chrissie is a knitting freak, she has the colouring and features of a standard knitting freak.  :D-13:

#27 LyndseyG

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:57 PM

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM, said:

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:41 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 11 March 2013 - 03:19 PM, said:

In securing the previous stitch in a wale, the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from either below or above. If the former, the stitch is denoted as a knit stitch or a plain stitch; if the latter, as a purl stitch. The two stitches are related in that a knit stitch seen from one side of the fabric appears as a purl stitch on the other side.

I love knitting terminology...it's so fun to just know the terms...maybe I'll use them in a crossword puzzle someday

I'll be honest, none of that made any sense... I am a bit sleepy though. :)
Here let me help you out. I'm just going to start documenting really cool aspects, and basic aspects of knitting. The terminilogy really makes me laugh...like how did someone come up with these terms for knitting? I'll just start with this entry, courtesy of Wiki:

    [edit] Courses and wales


Posted Image

Posted ImageStructure of stockinette, a common knitted fabric. The meandering red path defines one course, the path of the yarn through the fabric. The uppermost white loops are unsecured and "active", but they secure the red loops suspended from them. In turn, the red loops secure the white loops just below them, which in turn secure the loops below them, and so on.

Posted Image

Posted ImageAlternating wales of red and white knit stitches. Each stitch in a wale is suspended from the one above it.
Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. In weaving, threads are always straight, running parallel either lengthwise (warp threads) or crosswise (weft threads). By contrast, the yarn in knitted fabrics follows a meandering path (a course), forming symmetric loops (also called bights) symmetrically above and below the mean path of the yarn. These meandering loops can be stretched easily in different directions, which gives knitting much more elasticity than woven fabrics; depending on the yarn and knitting pattern, knitted garments can stretch as much as 500%. For this reason, knitting was initially developed for garments that must be elastic or stretch in response to the wearer's motions, such as socks and hosiery. For comparison, woven garments stretch mainly along one direction (the bias) and are not very elastic, unless they are woven from stretchable material such as spandex. Knitted garments are often more form-fitting than woven garments, since their elasticity allows them to follow the body's curvature closely; by contrast, curvature is introduced into most woven garments only with sewn darts, flares, gussets and gores, the seams of which lower the elasticity of the woven fabric still further. Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. Thread used in weaving is usually much finer than the yarn used in knitting, which can give the knitted fabric more bulk and less drape than a woven fabric.
If they are not secured, the loops of a knitted course will come undone when their yarn is pulled; this is known as ripping out, unravelling knitting, or humorously, frogging (because you 'rip it', this sounds like a frog croaking: 'rib-bit').[1] To secure a stitch, at least one new loop is passed through it. Although the new stitch is itself unsecured ("active" or "live"), it secures the stitch(es) suspended from it. A sequence of stitches in which each stitch is suspended from the next is called a wale.[2] To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding off. During knitting, the active stitches are secured mechanically, either from individual hooks (in knitting machines) or from a knitting needle or frame in hand-knitting.

Interesting... I've not heard of a few of those terms... And like yourself, I have wondered in the past where they came from. :)



#28 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:11 PM

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:57 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM, said:

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:41 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 11 March 2013 - 03:19 PM, said:

In securing the previous stitch in a wale, the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from either below or above. If the former, the stitch is denoted as a knit stitch or a plain stitch; if the latter, as a purl stitch. The two stitches are related in that a knit stitch seen from one side of the fabric appears as a purl stitch on the other side.

I love knitting terminology...it's so fun to just know the terms...maybe I'll use them in a crossword puzzle someday

I'll be honest, none of that made any sense... I am a bit sleepy though. :)
Here let me help you out. I'm just going to start documenting really cool aspects, and basic aspects of knitting. The terminilogy really makes me laugh...like how did someone come up with these terms for knitting? I'll just start with this entry, courtesy of Wiki:

[edit] Courses and wales


Posted Image

Posted ImageStructure of stockinette, a common knitted fabric. The meandering red path defines one course, the path of the yarn through the fabric. The uppermost white loops are unsecured and "active", but they secure the red loops suspended from them. In turn, the red loops secure the white loops just below them, which in turn secure the loops below them, and so on.

Posted Image

Posted ImageAlternating wales of red and white knit stitches. Each stitch in a wale is suspended from the one above it.
Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. In weaving, threads are always straight, running parallel either lengthwise (warp threads) or crosswise (weft threads). By contrast, the yarn in knitted fabrics follows a meandering path (a course), forming symmetric loops (also called bights) symmetrically above and below the mean path of the yarn. These meandering loops can be stretched easily in different directions, which gives knitting much more elasticity than woven fabrics; depending on the yarn and knitting pattern, knitted garments can stretch as much as 500%. For this reason, knitting was initially developed for garments that must be elastic or stretch in response to the wearer's motions, such as socks and hosiery. For comparison, woven garments stretch mainly along one direction (the bias) and are not very elastic, unless they are woven from stretchable material such as spandex. Knitted garments are often more form-fitting than woven garments, since their elasticity allows them to follow the body's curvature closely; by contrast, curvature is introduced into most woven garments only with sewn darts, flares, gussets and gores, the seams of which lower the elasticity of the woven fabric still further. Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. Thread used in weaving is usually much finer than the yarn used in knitting, which can give the knitted fabric more bulk and less drape than a woven fabric.
If they are not secured, the loops of a knitted course will come undone when their yarn is pulled; this is known as ripping out, unravelling knitting, or humorously, frogging (because you 'rip it', this sounds like a frog croaking: 'rib-bit').[1] To secure a stitch, at least one new loop is passed through it. Although the new stitch is itself unsecured ("active" or "live"), it secures the stitch(es) suspended from it. A sequence of stitches in which each stitch is suspended from the next is called a wale.[2] To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding off. During knitting, the active stitches are secured mechanically, either from individual hooks (in knitting machines) or from a knitting needle or frame in hand-knitting.

Interesting... I've not heard of a few of those terms... And like yourself, I have wondered in the past where they came from. :)
Have you ever had a "frogging"?

#29 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:36 PM

I could hang with you buddy.  :)

I know what frogging means... I hate having to do it. :rage: I have to frog a scarf I'm working on... Picked up crochet to procrastinate doing it.



#30 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:40 PM

View PostYa_Big_Tree, on 12 March 2013 - 03:36 PM, said:

I could hang with you buddy.  :)

I know what frogging means... I hate having to do it. :rage: I have to frog a scarf I'm working on... Picked up crochet to procrastinate doing it.
yeah frogging is tough to do...but sometimes ya gotta.

#31 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

Today's focus—Flat knitting versus circular knitting. Another fascinating aspect of our beloved hobby.

Circular knitting (also called "knitting in the round") is a form of knitting that can be used to create a seamless tube. Knitting is worked in rounds (the equivalent of rows in flat knitting) in a helix. Originally, circular knitting was done using a set of four or five double-pointed knitting needles. Later, circular needles were invented. A circular needle resembles two short knitting needles connected by a cable between them.

Flat knitting, on the other hand, is used, in its most basic form, to make flat, rectangular pieces of cloth.[11] It is done with two straight knitting needles and is worked in rows, horizontal lines of stitches. A circular knitting needle can also be used to create flat-knitted pieces that are too large for ordinary straight knitting needles, such as afghans and blankets.

Circular knitting is employed to create pieces that are circular or tube-shaped, such as hats, socks, mittens, and sleeves. Flat knitting is usually used to knit flat pieces like scarves, blankets, afghans, and the backs and fronts of sweaters.
There is also such a thing as finger knitting. Instead of needles, fingers are used to produce a tube of knitted fabric.

#32 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:13 PM

Posted Image
beginning of my latest project... one square done

#33 yaoi_myantidrug

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 11:22 PM

I have a latch hook project I need to finish, but I ran out of colors.

I'm on my first ever crochet project-just a scarf, nothing interesting.  If it goes well my next one will be raven law colors. Don't know why I didn't think of that initially.

#34 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:44 AM

I got 2 squares done... gonna do some more today. Starting to figure out the lay out in my head... not sure how many squares i need to make just yet.

#35 Mara

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 12:25 PM

So which one of you knitted that Clockwork Angels ski cap for Neil - the one he's showing off in his latest blog entry?

#36 umoveme

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 12:30 PM

http://Posted Image

#37 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:43 PM

View Postumoveme, on 14 March 2013 - 12:30 PM, said:

http://Posted Image
I've always loved your work Joelle! It's very bright, creative and inspiring!
:D

Esp: The Acorn hat :D

#38 umoveme

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 08:02 PM

Thank you!! Part of me wishes it wasn't 77 degrees out!!

#39 Ya_Big_Tree

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:26 PM

View Postumoveme, on 14 March 2013 - 08:02 PM, said:

Thank you!! Part of me wishes it wasn't 77 degrees out!!
Pfft... that's what air conditioning is for. :P

Still plenty cold here... was -5 C with some nasty wind today. I can't wait for Spring to hurry it's ass up and get here.

#40 LyndseyG

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 05:24 PM

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 12 March 2013 - 03:11 PM, said:

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:57 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 12 March 2013 - 02:49 PM, said:

View PostLyndseyG, on 12 March 2013 - 02:41 PM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 11 March 2013 - 03:19 PM, said:

In securing the previous stitch in a wale, the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from either below or above. If the former, the stitch is denoted as a knit stitch or a plain stitch; if the latter, as a purl stitch. The two stitches are related in that a knit stitch seen from one side of the fabric appears as a purl stitch on the other side.

I love knitting terminology...it's so fun to just know the terms...maybe I'll use them in a crossword puzzle someday

I'll be honest, none of that made any sense... I am a bit sleepy though. :)
Here let me help you out. I'm just going to start documenting really cool aspects, and basic aspects of knitting. The terminilogy really makes me laugh...like how did someone come up with these terms for knitting? I'll just start with this entry, courtesy of Wiki:

    [edit] Courses and wales


Posted Image

Posted ImageStructure of stockinette, a common knitted fabric. The meandering red path defines one course, the path of the yarn through the fabric. The uppermost white loops are unsecured and "active", but they secure the red loops suspended from them. In turn, the red loops secure the white loops just below them, which in turn secure the loops below them, and so on.

Posted Image

Posted ImageAlternating wales of red and white knit stitches. Each stitch in a wale is suspended from the one above it.
Like weaving, knitting is a technique for producing a two-dimensional fabric made from a one-dimensional yarn or thread. In weaving, threads are always straight, running parallel either lengthwise (warp threads) or crosswise (weft threads). By contrast, the yarn in knitted fabrics follows a meandering path (a course), forming symmetric loops (also called bights) symmetrically above and below the mean path of the yarn. These meandering loops can be stretched easily in different directions, which gives knitting much more elasticity than woven fabrics; depending on the yarn and knitting pattern, knitted garments can stretch as much as 500%. For this reason, knitting was initially developed for garments that must be elastic or stretch in response to the wearer's motions, such as socks and hosiery. For comparison, woven garments stretch mainly along one direction (the bias) and are not very elastic, unless they are woven from stretchable material such as spandex. Knitted garments are often more form-fitting than woven garments, since their elasticity allows them to follow the body's curvature closely; by contrast, curvature is introduced into most woven garments only with sewn darts, flares, gussets and gores, the seams of which lower the elasticity of the woven fabric still further. Extra curvature can be introduced into knitted garments without seams, as in the heel of a sock; the effect of darts, flares, etc. can be obtained with short rows or by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches. Thread used in weaving is usually much finer than the yarn used in knitting, which can give the knitted fabric more bulk and less drape than a woven fabric.
If they are not secured, the loops of a knitted course will come undone when their yarn is pulled; this is known as ripping out, unravelling knitting, or humorously, frogging (because you 'rip it', this sounds like a frog croaking: 'rib-bit').[1] To secure a stitch, at least one new loop is passed through it. Although the new stitch is itself unsecured ("active" or "live"), it secures the stitch(es) suspended from it. A sequence of stitches in which each stitch is suspended from the next is called a wale.[2] To secure the initial stitches of a knitted fabric, a method for casting on is used; to secure the final stitches in a wale, one uses a method of binding off. During knitting, the active stitches are secured mechanically, either from individual hooks (in knitting machines) or from a knitting needle or frame in hand-knitting.

Interesting... I've not heard of a few of those terms... And like yourself, I have wondered in the past where they came from. :)
Have you ever had a "frogging"?

Er... If I'm understanding this correctly then not deliberately no... There was one time when I was working on my first sweater and I put my work down halfway through a row. As I put it down I accidentally pulled a few stitches off the needle and they unlooped several rows. I had to sit with a crotchet hook and loop them back up... Now I try to always finish a row before putting down my work if I can help it.





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