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Maverick

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Everything posted by Maverick

  1. How could I forget Tony and Frank???? The thing about the classic hard rock aesthetic is probably a pretty big player in me being drawn to the SG now. Not that my Les Paul also isn't that, or my Kiesel (definitely looks wise, and it's humbucker does really nice with harder rock and higher gain sounds.) But the SG (especially the cherry red ones) just have an aggressive "IDGAF I'm going to melt your face off" look.
  2. Same here. I can't recall ever playing one, holding one, even wanting to take one off the wall at a guitar shop. About 11 years ago, when I was active in the local blues jam scene, there was a guy who got a Gibson SG and played it at the jams. He was probably looking for a different sound than the bevy of Stratocasters and Telecasters that were always present. From what I recall, he sounded great playing it. I know tone is in the fingers, but having the SG certainly didn't hinder his overall sound. Pro's who use an SG that inspire me are Angus Young (of course, and really the only inspiration I'd need,) Alex always played one when they did Roll The Bones in concert, Andrew Stockdale from Wolfmother uses them a lot. And of course there is Derek Trucks, but I have never been able to get into his playing. For years I was just completely indifferent to them, and probably would have dismissed out of hand the idea of actually owning one. I would scowl whenever I saw Lifeson break it out for Roll The Bones. What the Hell was he thinking? Didn't he have a PRS or Les Paul that could do the job? It didn't help that I'm not really a fan of that song, either. But lately the idea of owning one has just become more and more appealing. Maybe I'll play one and just think that my Les Paul already covers that ground, and save myself $900.
  3. Lately I've begun GAS'ing hard for an SG model guitar. Epiphone has the 1961 SG Les Paul Standard with Gibson Burstbucker pickups, poly gloss finish, and hard case for $849. Gibson has SG Standard with the 490 Humbucker pickups, nitro finish, and soft case for $1600. After doing some reading, I think I would probably like the Epiphone better. The pickups seem more in line with what I'm after, tone wise, from the guitar. I'm more than ok with the polyurethane gloss finish. The two Epiphone 335's I have both have the poly finish, as well as my Kiesel and Music Man Albert Lee. The 335's have the gloss on the neck. which is what the SG will have, and I quite like it, although I would probably at least hold a Gibson SG for a bit to see how it at least feels in my hands. The thing about the Epiphone SG is that if I find I don't care for the Burstbuckers, I can buy whatever pickups I want to replace them, and still won't have spent as much as I would have buying a Gibson. If I buy the Gibson and end up not liking those pickups, I'll either live with it, or it will become a $2000 guitar as I go to replace them. The Epiphone is available at a Guitar Center not terribly far from me, so it looks like I'll be heading out that way later this week.
  4. I really dig Lido Shuffle and Dirty Lowdown.
  5. Oh wow, this is very sad to hear. Alan was one of my favorite drummers, and was, I believe, very underrated for what he did in Yes. RIP Alan.
  6. A big plus to living in Switzerland would have the be the flag.
  7. Wow, this is surprising. I remember going through a New Age phase during my first year in college, and Vangelis was one of the main people I listened to during that, even though he had been around long before. I had actually purchased a couple of the Jon and Vangelis records a couple of years before when I was still in high school. I think I had heard Th Friends of Mr. Cairo one night on the radio, and I had to have it. Then I heard Heaven and Hell, and Jon Anderson singing on "So Long Ago, So Clear." Years later, it was another Jon and Vangelis collaboration with "Italian Song." Just truly beautiful music. And I'll always remember the music from the wine commercial back in 1987 (Was it Gallo wine?) and it just sounded like Vangelis, and it actually was. I guess I'm going down a Vangelis rabbit-hole today.
  8. Maybe we should do a poll on whether or not you make too many polls. Seriously, though: Yes, you are known for making polls, but it is not the number of polls you make, but rather the number of options for which we can vote in any given poll you've made, that make you stand out.
  9. I am really appolled at these bad puns.
  10. It's annoying AF to be honest. Not that I go to MOTS all that frequently, but if I did, I'd sure get tired of seeing HUNDREDS of polls with stuff like Blue Oyster Cult Elimination Round 7, Toto Elimination Round 9, on and on and on and on. It's bad enough that the New Topics section is dominated by them, sometimes 4 out of the five are all polls. Right now in MOTS, 21 of the 30 topics on the first page are polls (this does not include the pinned topics up top.) Honestly, I am deeply ambivalent to these polls. On the one hand, they are good because they get and keep members posting and coming back and being involved on a board for a band that has been inactive for 7 years, and will never record or tour again as that particular unit. So that's good. On the other hand, does every fvcking band ever need a poll on it's discography?
  11. And lastly, the Strymon Mobius This is Strymon's big box modulation solution. I had one of these before, probably about 8-9 years ago. I moved on from it because I thought I wanted to have individual units for phaser, flanger, tremolo, etc. But I never really got around to getting those, and I thought why not just get the Mobius again (this one was used.) The only analog effect that I have that is also on the Mobius is a Fulltone Deja-Vibe which is a Uni-vibe clone. I just feel there is something inherently necessary to having a real analog Uni-Vibe if you are trying to comp Hendrix, Trower, Gilmour tones. Digital will only get you so far. But there's a way your tone can absolutely scream with a fuzz going into the Uni-Vibe, then into a dirty amp. It's what you hear in the solo on Machine Gun and on The Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock.
  12. Next up - Strymon Timeline As I mentioned above, having been unable to acquire the Suhr Discovery, I went scorched Earth and got the Timeline. This is an amazing delay unit that has pretty much anything you could want, a lot of stuff you never knew you wanted, and more than a few things you'll probably never use. One of the things that made me want to go with this was the digital screen that allows me to dial i precise BPM or milliseconds for delay time. Tap tempo is great, and I generally get good results using it, but sometimes I just want to know exactly where I'm at. This will pretty much be a stay at home pedal for when I want to really tinker with the different engines and do deep dives into parameters, etc. I have smaller grab and go units for if I ever get to play out again.
  13. Here are my most recent acquisitions, in order of their arrival: These are the Catalinbread Dreamcoat and Skewer. The Dreamcoat is a pedal recreation of the Aiwa reel to reel tape deck that Ritchie Blackmore used as a pre-amp before going into his Marshall. It can do light gain break up to fuzz on fuzz depending on how you dial in the Mic volume and Saturation. It also has an internal trim pot to adjust the frequency that the Freq knobs acts as a volume for. I have yet to mess around with that. The Skewer is a recreation of the Hornby-Skewes treble booster that Blackmore also used in conjunction with the Aiwa tape deck. But in addition to just the volume knob, the Skewer has a knob that take it from a full range frequency boost all the way counter clockwise, the the original treble boost, all the way clockwise. The third knob adds gain. It uses silicone transistors, as opposed to the germanium transistors used by the Dallas Range Master. Using the two independently yields great results. Using the Dreamcoat by itself is great for a sound that is not typical of most other OD's or distortions out there. It is very much it's own thing, which is really cool, but using them together is where it's at. They were designed as a pair, and I bought them as a set in one box. There's even a sticker in the box that shows the entire portrait the comprises the artwork of the two pedals.
  14. I need to revive this thread. What do you need?
  15. Yes, but not because of the software upgrade.
  16. If I may suggest: Take the board down on Friday and bring it back up on Sunday. :lol:
  17. Any song that incorporates the Boss Metal Zone into it's lyrics is great in my book. I don't have that pedal, but now I might have to get one (Waza Craft version, of course!) Fun fact: In early 2012 I sold my 1986 Gibson Les Paul Custom to a vintage guitar shop here in Virginia. Almost two years later, the same guitar showed up in the same shop. I happened to be there the day they put it out on display. Having regretted selling it in the first place, I bought it back. When I asked the shop owner who had purchased it, he said it was bought by the guitar player from the band Clutch.
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