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My brother shot the video, I attached the music.


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#1 JARG

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 11:23 PM

My brother recently went on a nostalgia tour of our stomping grounds in central Texas and took this video of a place the family spent many a summer day. Enjoy!



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#2 Lucas

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 01:42 PM

Nice !!!!

Jarg, that was shot with a drone I assume - do you know what kind he uses ??

#3 JARG

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 02:01 PM

View PostLucas, on 05 February 2018 - 01:42 PM, said:

Nice !!!!

Jarg, that was shot with a drone I assume - do you know what kind he uses ??

Yeah, some kinda' drone. I don't know the make or model, though.

#4 goose

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 05:29 PM

A beautiful spot!

#5 JARG

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 05:52 PM

View Postgoose, on 05 February 2018 - 05:29 PM, said:

A beautiful spot!
Indeed. In the Spring when the creek is flowing better and there's lots of green, it was a magical place to be.

Here's a pre-Civil War description of the mill and surrounding countryside from one of the Mill's early owners:

Quote

"Having all my life had a penchant for mills, I recognized this as "my long lost brother," and at once opened negotiations for it. The dream of my life was fulfilled and I was at last the proud possessor of a bona fide mill, and that in one of the most picturesque spots to be found. A mountain had been cleft from north to south, to permit the stream to pass through, and then from east to west, the southern portion having been entirely removed, so that the almost perpendicular walls between which flowed the creek, turned away at right angles at the mouth of the gorge, where the stream fell over a precipice twenty-eight feet or more in height into a deep pool below; thence rippling away between green banks, shaded by the various trees indigenous to the country. Just at the foot of the falls on the east stood the mill, a three-story frame building, the second story being on a level with the bank, with which it was connected by a gangway. A patriarchal pecan tree lifted its stately head beside the building, caressing it with its slender branches....

Hamilton's creek drains quite a scope of country, and when swelled by heavy rains, the flood being congested within the narrow gorge above the mill, rises rapidly and comes down in a solid wall of water which pours over the falls like a miniature Niagara. The mill, however, is protected by the bluff. I have often seen the creek, which is ordinarily a trivial stream, become a torrent within a few minutes. On one occasion a party of sightseers had a narrow escape. Having wended their way up into the gorge, along the margin of the shallow stream, they were startled by a roar above them, and the guide being acquainted with the vagaries of the stream, ordered them to climb for their lives. Laying hold of the bushes in the face of the steep declivity, they scrambled up out of harm's way and watched the angry flood of waters rush past and leap the falls with a report like thunder, sending up clouds of spray. The visitors were treated to more of a show than they had contracted for, as if the creek had got up a special benefit for them. They had to climb to the top of the bluff and cross over the table land and scramble down on the southern side. High up in the face of the cliff on the further side from the mill was a cave-like opening in which a colony of bees had taken up their abode. It was a source of much aggravation to the boys that there was no way of appropriating the store of honey which was doubtless concealed within the cave, there being millions of bees to protect it. No plan was devised to oust them during my regime, and they are probably still in possession."





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