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#21 treeduck

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:57 PM

QUOTE (treeduck @ Oct 17 2006, 10:15 PM)
I forgot 90% of the last one but the next one that I'm gonna read I can't remember a damn thing about at all. I'm talking 650% of it!! The main reason for this is probably because I wasn't too impressed with it at the time and it drained right out of my memory... A good reason to read it then...and a bad reason.

But read it I will...

Here's what my 1998 hardback version looks like...

user posted image

Yes Bag of Bones or Bag o'shite as I call it... Maybe my expectations were too high back then? When they did publicity for it over here in '98 they were billing it as "better than The Shining" and silly me I believed them. It was of course very, very far from being better than the Shining, VERY far, very far in fact from being anywhere near in it's league. That's one thing I do remember. The only thing. I don't have a clue about the characters, the story, how it ended and that's a good thing since I'm going to be reading it. And with my expectations lowered maybe I'll enjoy it more...

This was King's attempt at a more "literary" novel, a ghost story, where atmosphere is at a premium and the emphasis is less on gore and bawdy language and more on feelings and events threatening to happen but not quite making it ie: watered down King=literary. Oh yeah I remember that but again that's from the publicity. bad sign when you remember the publicity campaign more clearly than the actual novel in question.

Anyway all I'm saying is King and his publishers were making a big noise about this book, but then they always do. King is as good a salesman as anyone, he's doing the same thing right now with his new one Lisey's Story. He's got this theory, which I read about in an interview with King in The New York Times, about writing good, great and not so great novels. he reckons they come in sevens, 6 average ones then a killer, and further after 7 lots of 7 you get the 49th and this book is the absolute most bad ass killing killer book of them all. I'm talking REALLY REALLY GOOD. And of course the 49th, this super novel just happens to be his latest book, oh of course it is!!! Lisey's story is the ultimate killer king book then!! This is a theory you can only come up with if you've written 49 or more books, which King of course has and only if you're a born bullshitter, because bullshit is what that theory is and SK is not the best storyteller in the world and not a bullshitter...I wonder what his next theory is gonna be? "The 17th book that I wrote in the bath with my feet in the air, after the fourth full moon of the millenium to the power of 9 with bells on is obviously the best novel I've ever written and errr it just happens to be my latest one..."

So ok, according to Steve his latest novel is the ultimate book that he's ever produced.  So that means that 1998's incredible "better than the Shining" literary novel, Bag of Bones, must therefore just be one of the average 40 odd then?  Well let's find out shall we...before i forget about the book altogether...

(hmmmm that's dramatic but I'm not actually gonna start it till tomorrow...ner ner ne-ner, ner ner)

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There is a connection between Bag of Bones and The Shining after all...

Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...
Reading Bag of Bones, day after day, makes treeduck a dull boy...



The problem with this book is there's altogether too much Mike Noonan. Unfortunately he's the first person narrator that we're stuck with for all 500+ (in hardback) pages, with his crying and his writer's block and his ZONE and his dreams and his pathetic ghosts... Boooooooring. And he's annoying too. Even when Ki tells him of her own ghosts he stubbornly pretends he has none himself. Why? Even he doesn't know. When the shit hits the fan instead of leaving town for a while till things die down, with the townsfolk hating them, the ghosts out to get them, his book going tits up, he hangs around doing nothing except thinking about shagging the 21 year old mother of Ki, but he won't even go over and do that!!! What a dick!!

I suppose King got some kind of emotion out of me at least: disgust...

Literary King means toned down, watered down boring King I'm afraid and that's all.

A very poor effort from Steve one of his very worst. I only hope Lisey's Story, his brand new one, isn't gonna turn out like this. It has a certain Bag of Bones feel to it based on the synopsis and the publicity, yeah it's like déjà vu he's even coming over here to the UK again, like with Bones back in 98...

Anyway that's it I don't want to talk about Bag of Bones anymore it's a bag of shite and it's done and dusted...

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#22 treeduck

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 01:33 PM

Ok next up is the most recent work that I've read by him, (which of course means I've read nothing by him this decade thus far), Heart's in Atlantis. I read this one when it came out back in 1999. Here's how my hardback version looks:

user posted image


It's not a horror novel, it's not even a true novel, it's a collection of five stories along the lines of Different Seasons but all five stories are connected and presented in chronological order. I haven't seen the Anthony Hopkins film version so all my information on it comes from that one reading 7 years ago.
(Notice how they haven't filmed Bag of Bones in the 8 years since it was published, even Hollywood can't make anything out of that particular yarn).

I remember this one being far from classic King but still an interesting, not bad little collection. Well I say little, once again it's 500 pages in hardback, he's not one to do things by half even if it uses up a ton of paper in the process. King once said upon announcement of one of his retirements: "I've killed enough trees already!" King though has retired more times than Sugar Ray Leonard, in other words he'll never retire. Yep he'll be typing in his coffin I expect, but let's hope that doesn't happen for a good few years yet...

#23 deadwing2112

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 08:57 PM

QUOTE (treeduck @ Oct 24 2006, 09:18 PM)
QUOTE (deadwing2112 @ Oct 24 2006, 08:49 PM)
Pretty cool treeduck so far.

How lucky am I? I got Dark Tower 2 and 3 for 2.50 each at some stand in a sucky mall.

Thanks mate...

Those are good volumes too. I was pretty unimpressed by part one, so much so that I'm not even sure King meant for "The Gunslinger" volume to turn into a huge seven part series at all at the time he first wrote it. The difference between that and "The Drawing of the Three" is the difference between night and day...

I haven't read the revised version of The Gunslinger though... King has said, now that it's all finished, that he's going to revise all the volumes and inisists The Dark Tower is one novel. I doubt he'll ever release the whole thing in one volume though, it'd be like a 3500 page book!!

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I thought The Gunslinger was pretty good. Not worth spending 10 dollars on it though.

#24 treeduck

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 09:23 PM

QUOTE (deadwing2112 @ Oct 26 2006, 08:57 PM)
QUOTE (treeduck @ Oct 24 2006, 09:18 PM)
QUOTE (deadwing2112 @ Oct 24 2006, 08:49 PM)
Pretty cool treeduck so far.

How lucky am I? I got Dark Tower 2 and 3 for 2.50 each at some stand in a sucky mall.

Thanks mate...

Those are good volumes too. I was pretty unimpressed by part one, so much so that I'm not even sure King meant for "The Gunslinger" volume to turn into a huge seven part series at all at the time he first wrote it. The difference between that and "The Drawing of the Three" is the difference between night and day...

I haven't read the revised version of The Gunslinger though... King has said, now that it's all finished, that he's going to revise all the volumes and inisists The Dark Tower is one novel. I doubt he'll ever release the whole thing in one volume though, it'd be like a 3500 page book!!

ohmy.gif

I thought The Gunslinger was pretty good. Not worth spending 10 dollars on it though.

You have to read it if you're gonna read the whole series but it's clearly just an introduction to the world of Roland of Gilead...

Here's what my version looked like back in the day...

user posted image

#25 treeduck

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 07:09 PM

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I've read the first story "Low Men in Yellow Coats" and it was good. It reminded me very much of Different Season's "The Body" but with a supernatural element to it as well. King is very good at writing stories about childhood coming to an end in a sad kind of lament set in a bygone era it seems, in this case 1960. This coming of age aspect to the story also reminded me of the kids in 50's derry in It. The supernatural part of it, Ted and the Low Men, reminded me of several tales but the one that came to mind was The Library Policeman from Four Past Midnight, just a feel of that really.

The story is also heavily connected to the Dark Tower series via Ted. The tower, The gunslinger and more all get a mention even a one line recap of Roland's current position after The Wizard and Glass but without giving anything away...

This story also has accounted for half of this whole book so that leaves 260 pages for the four other stories...

The next one is the title story...

#26 treeduck

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 01:12 AM

Ok I've finally finished Hearts in Atlantis and it kind of dragged a little over the last four stories mainly because of the disappointing title story which seemed to add up to a lot of nothing but rambling about the 60s college days. it kind of reminded me of King's early Bachman stories in a way. The best story is obviously Low Men in Yellow Coats and that's the problem with this book, after that one's done the rest of the book is a bit of an anticlimax. The other story that I enjoyed a lot though was the fourth one set in 1999 where two guys think back vividly to their vietnam days, this one really engaged me and made me laugh too.

Favourite characters: Ted and Bobby Garfield from Low Men

Wild card: Ronnie Malenfant - "that card playing bastard" - this character cracked me up, (I imagined him as that guy out of The Warriors, yeah the one who looks like Geddy Lee, even though King described him differently). There's always one crazy asshole in King's books somewhere, usually many more than one, in this book Malenfant's the guy. He's only a peripheral character really, he's the man obsessed with playing hearts among hearts obsessives in the title story and he reappears in the 3rd and 4th stories as a memory where he's still obsessed with "chasing the Bitch!"

The most important character though seemed to me to be another supporting player, kind of the lynch pin of the whole five part story, Carol Gerber. Each main character in each of the first four stories; Bobby Garfield (Low Men), Pete Riley (Hearts), Bill Shearman (Blind Willie) and John Sullivan (Why we're in Vietnam), their lives seemed to revolve around Carol even though she's either a supporting character, a memory or an imagined figure who exists only in newspaper cuttings.

Overall this book isn't bad but as I said the first story is so much better than the others that you feel like you've finished the book even though you've got 4 stories and half of it to go. Which is why I kind of made my way through these a little listlessly.

How does it compare to the previous 2 books? Well, it's way above Bag of Bones without a doubt but it's also waaaay below Wizard and Glass, nearer to the bag than the wizard...

Well now that Atlantis has sunk again, what's next??

Don't worry, all will be revealed in good order...

#27 treeduck

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 02:16 PM

The next Stephen King on my list is not even by King...

Well it is ahh you know what I mean I think...

user posted image

This is how my 1996 HB version looks (although mine is in better condition than this one I found on ebay, jeez it was hard getting a pic of the thing).

This novel was published simultaneously with Desperation in 96 and was supposed to be lost "Bachman" work, but of course he's merely King's alter ego. A lot of people claimed that it was just the same book written twice. It certainly features some of the same characters as Desperation or the same names anyway but they are completely different in each book, or some of them are at least. I don't remember much more than that, after all it's been 10 years ago since I read it...  I think these two books are designed to be read one after the other (great marketing ploy), so yes I'll be reading Desperation after this one too as that's around here somewhere too...

I suppose the double release did make extra cash but I think they did it at least partly for fun, check out the catalogue listing inside the book where it lists the author as Bachman, Richard 1947-85 - yeah, diseased in 1985 after he was discovered as King's pseudonym by one Steve Brown. King got a novel out of that escapade too (the Dark Half), he's nothing if not resourceful when it comes to story ideas...

Anyway, The Regulators is a pretty slim volume especially by King standards, it's much slimmer than Desperation, but then King was always more concise as Bachman...

A lot of people it seems didn't like this one I seem to recall, myself I remember it being quite a good read, but I not sure, and there's only one way to find out, I need to meet The Regulators all over again and fnd out one way or the other...



#28 treeduck

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 02:28 PM

I'm well on with The Regulators now and it's pretty good. One thing that strikes me about these four books I've read so far is that they're all completely different. SK has gone from dark fantasy with western overtones to slow burning ghost story to suspense-tinged melodrama to violent supernatural thriller.

One downside to re-reads has reared it's ugly head though, I've remembered where the source of all the mayhem in this story is coming from and King drops clues in between chapters in the form of TV guide programme descriptions, children's toy ads and newspaper cuttings, otherwise I'd not know what the hell was going on. Still it's only a vague recollection, the book itself still reads like it's all brand new to me...

Oh yeah if anyone was fooled into thinking that Bachman was actually a real person, one thing gives it away as Stephen King right away: one of the characters is a writer...  eyesre4.gif King should not be allowed to make anymore of his characters into writers. In King's world there must be millions of them, how can they all make a living that's what I want to know???  laugh.gif  

#29 madra sneachta

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 03:00 PM

QUOTE (treeduck @ Nov 6 2006, 08:28 PM)
King should not be allowed to make anymore of his characters into writers. In King's world there must be millions of them, how can they all make a living that's what I want to know???  laugh.gif

I've been reading the blurb of the new book Lisey's Story , and I'm glad to report the heroine is not a writer.

She's a writer's wife!!!!!!!!!.

It's progress though wink.gif  biggrin.gif  

#30 treeduck

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 03:08 PM

QUOTE (madra sneachta @ Nov 6 2006, 03:00 PM)
QUOTE (treeduck @ Nov 6 2006, 08:28 PM)
King should not be allowed to make anymore of his characters into writers. In King's world there must be millions of them, how can they all make a living that's what I want to know???  laugh.gif

I've been reading the blurb of the new book Lisey's Story , and I'm glad to report the heroine is not a writer.

She's a writer's wife!!!!!!!!!.

It's progress though wink.gif  biggrin.gif

Yeah, I've got a copy of that and I'll be reading it eventually. King reckons it's his best ever novel but then he always rates his latest work... His previous favourite was Misery which of course is about another writer though that really is an excellent one...

  

#31 treeduck

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 01:18 PM

QUOTE (treeduck @ Nov 4 2006, 02:16 PM)
The next Stephen King on my list is not even by King...

Well it is ahh you know what I mean I think...

user posted image

This is how my 1996 HB version looks (although mine is in better condition than this one I found on ebay, jeez it was hard getting a pic of the thing).

This novel was published simultaneously with Desperation in 96 and was supposed to be lost "Bachman" work, but of course he's merely King's alter ego. A lot of people claimed that it was just the same book written twice. It certainly features some of the same characters as Desperation or the same names anyway but they are completely different in each book, or some of them are at least. I don't remember much more than that, after all it's been 10 years ago since I read it...  I think these two books are designed to be read one after the other (great marketing ploy), so yes I'll be reading Desperation after this one too as that's around here somewhere too...

I suppose the double release did make extra cash but I think they did it at least partly for fun, check out the catalogue listing inside the book where it lists the author as Bachman, Richard 1947-85 - yeah, diseased in 1985 after he was discovered as King's pseudonym by one Steve Brown. King got a novel out of that escapade too (the Dark Half), he's nothing if not resourceful when it comes to story ideas...

Anyway, The Regulators is a pretty slim volume especially by King standards, it's much slimmer than Desperation, but then King was always more concise as Bachman...

A lot of people it seems didn't like this one I seem to recall, myself I remember it being quite a good read, but I not sure, and there's only one way to find out, I need to meet The Regulators all over again and fnd out one way or the other...

Ok, Yes the Regulators, hmmmm The Regulators was a very good and exciting read with some blackly funny moments; such as the scene where the woman's arm is hanging on by a few fibres and she's freaking out and these two guys are trying to staunch the blood flow with a belt and the arm comes off, not something I'd normally find funny but in King's hands this kind of thing can end up being comicly drawn...

It's a very good novel of supernatural goings on that reminds me a little of a few of the late-80s Dean Koontz chillers, maybe Midnight or The Bad Place, but it's not up with the King classics or even the near-classics. Here's the main reason why: the story hits the ground running from page 1 with no messing around but King slips ever expanding background material in the form of journals written by the autistic child's aunt and the copper mine geologist from Desperation, Nevada, between chapters. This is fine at the beginning as things are building up slightly and the sections are short or it's a one page newspaper clipping. Early on this adds to the flavour of the of the story but he continues to do this right throughout the book with increasingly long entries. So after chapter 10 when the tale is reaching fever pitch, he slots in 22 pages of journal entries totally derailing the story momentum and causing me to grudgingly plow through the section finding myself needing a recap when I finally get done with it. Now The info in these sections does fill in the blanks for the reader but the way it's done totally slows down and breaks apart the narrative.

I did enjoy the book overall though and unlike other books I'm now gonna get the chance to meet all these names and faces again in the The Regulator's twin brother Desperation. Yes Johnny Marinville and co will be back for another crack at Tak the terrible, this time thoough, they go to Nevada instead of Nevada going to Ohio via psychic vampire Tak. Yep Johnny marinville the writer will turn up again all new and unmolested, but a different Johnny Marinville, with a whole different back catalogue and back history I imagine. It's gonna be a bit like leaping across to a parallel universe to see how another version of this story turns out...

More in the next post...


#32 treeduck

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 06:03 PM

Before I move on to Desperation a little info on Richard Bachman...




SK has just been over here in the Uk on a book tour, here's some pics...

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What's this got to do with Senor Bachman I hear you screech???

Well...

At the press conference in Battersea someone asked him if there'd be anymore books by Bachman and king surprised everyone by saying yes there would be. He found one in his basement that he wrote in 1973 called Blaze and it'll be published soon. Fans and aficionados have known about this book for quite a while so it's cool that he decided to publish it. King says it's going to be updated and probably revised as well...

If you want to check this out yourself here's the link:

http://www.liljas-library.com/


So that's Bachman and that's King's UK tour meanwhile here is...


user posted image

...yes that's right The british 1996 hardback version of the next book in my ducky King fest...

And without further ado it's off to meet the Carver family once again, a different Carver family yet the same. And the Jacksons and Johnny Marinville, the obligatory writer, and their battle with Tak take 2... Come with me gentle reader as I- wait a sec I'm starting to sound like King!! Forgive me you Rush looneys and finally adieu...





#33 treeduck

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 02:17 AM

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So far (page 186) this one isn't quite matching it's twin The Regulators. It still feels like it's warming up though as yet...

Two excellently creepy sections stand out for me so far. Both feature Steve Ames (Johnny Marinville's "roadie") and his hitchhiker Cynthia Smith, who also teamed up in that other Desperation-King reality The Regulators. The sections in question are when they investigate Marinville's disappearance alone in the desert and get an awfully terrible feeling of being watched and when they check out the town's Marie Celeste-like mining offices, feeling a dread growing ever stronger minute by minute. A dread that was very well conveyed to this reader...

#34 treeduck

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:28 PM

Now that Desperation is over it's time for a few comments. It starts out like a short story about a maniac cop who picks off unlucky motorists that happen to cross his path, but by part two it expands into an apocalyptic tale of good versus evil along the lines of the Stand but smaller in scope. Like in The Stand, the survivors of the early horrific events band together and become greater than the sum of their parts. Tak is this story's Randall Flagg and the power he has over scorpions, spiders, coyotes, snakes, rats, cougars, bats and buzzards seems Flagg-like behaviour though it's been a long while since I read that novel so details are foggy. Like Flagg he appears overwhelmingly powerful but as in The Stand it's almost as if the mere fact that they don't give in to him is enough to save them. Tak comes over in the end like a supernatural bully who doesn't like being hit back. What's interesting is that in both Desperation (David Carver) and The Regulators (Seth Garin) a special child is responsible for ultimately defeating it.

There's a lot of exciting and spooky moments throughout but there are some parts that drag, particularly David Carver's religious conversion. Generally though it beats it's sister novel The Regulators (which I mention yet again because a couple of scenes actually appear in both books, like the cougar attack on Steve Ames, and are virtually identical, the location and exact circumstance set them apart) by a head, and finishes up as an excellent horror novel, not quite King's best but only a step or two down from that....

Ok so far the 5 books I've re-read have all been from the 90s and I've yet to read any "new" King work from this decade and nothing post-accident...

So it'll be 21st century King next...

#35 treeduck

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:39 PM

And the first "new" 21st century King for me will be...

user posted image


Yes, From a Buick 8. I've heard people say that this is just King repeating himself, that it's watered-down Christine but we'll see. It is about a spooky car like Christine and set in Pennsylvania like Christine so there's obvious similarities for sure - I wonder, does King associate Pennsylvania with haunted automobiles? Anyway I'm not expecting it to be a classic maybe something on the same level as Hearts in Atlantis, not bad, but nearer the bottom of the King pile than the top.  

#36 GeddyRulz

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:39 PM

"Misery" was supposed to be a Bachman book, before King's cover was blown.  "The Dark Half" (What crap I thought that was!) should've been a Bachman book as well, I think.  Interesting that now he's once again releasing books under Bachman, even though everyone knows they're by King.

#37 treeduck

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 04:19 PM

QUOTE (GeddyRulz @ Nov 20 2006, 03:39 PM)
"Misery" was supposed to be a Bachman book, before King's cover was blown.  "The Dark Half" (What crap I thought that was!) should've been a Bachman book as well, I think.  Interesting that now he's once again releasing books under Bachman, even though everyone knows they're by King.

One thing about Misery, King has just stated that he thinks it's his best novel (after his new one - of course eyesre4.gif  ) so if he thought it was that good, why make it a Bachman book?

I actually enjoyed the Dark Half, the idea was a silly one but king managed to to turn it into a great read, I particularly enjoyed "that high-toned son of a bitch" George Stark.

Both these are on my king fest list so i'll talk about them again later on no doubt...  

#38 GeddyRulz

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 04:53 PM

QUOTE (treeduck @ Nov 20 2006, 04:19 PM)
I actually enjoyed the Dark Half, the idea was a silly one but king managed to to turn it into a great read,

I can almost get beyond its "silly idea" and suspend disbelief, but the novel builded to a lame and cliche ending.  

#39 treeduck

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 05:01 PM

QUOTE (GeddyRulz @ Nov 20 2006, 04:53 PM)
QUOTE (treeduck @ Nov 20 2006, 04:19 PM)
I actually enjoyed the Dark Half, the idea was a silly one but king managed to to turn it into a great read,

I can almost get beyond its "silly idea" and suspend disbelief, but the novel builded to a lame and cliche ending.

I've forgotten the very end of it, don't tell me though with these king re-reads I'm really seeing the value of forgetting stuff...

yes.gif



#40 treeduck

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 02:52 PM

Ok I'm in the middle of From a Buick 8 and the unthinkable has happened!! I'm reading a Stephen King book that's more boring than Bag of Bones. How can this be, especially when the subject matter (a spooky car) interests me so much more?

Well the problem here is there's not enough story in this for a novel length book. It's a short story that's been extended and therefore padded out with lots and lots of blah blah blah. King goes off on annoying tangents all over the place when you just wish he'd get on with it. King also goes to great lengths to show just how much research he's done and it feels like homework to read these parts. The whole thing feels like an exercise in fact with it's clever Now and Then chapter headings and flashback style, it's almost like a demonstration follow-up fictional example to his On-Writing instructional book. At least bag of Bones felt like a real novel.

The good news is the best chapter I've read so far (the dessection of an alien monstrosity that the car brought) was the latest one so maybe it'll improve from here, so far though NOT so good...


Edited by treeduck, 24 November 2006 - 03:34 PM.






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