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Narps why do think women wouldn't like them?

Just the style of music and Ged's voice mostly I suppose. She is not into complex music i.e Rush, Yes. For example my wife (of 34 years) never really "liked" them but has put up with them over the years because she knows how much I do. Same with golf. When we were first married in 81' we saw Journey 3 times together during those early years. That radio friendly style and Steve Perry's voice is more her speed. Of all "my bands" from back in the day the only ones she seemed to enjoy really were Journey and Pat Travers Band of all bands. Today she listens to the popular music of today which is about as silly, stupid and simplistic as it gets. I can't stand it...

My wife is the same way...Anne Murrary, Elton John, Celine Dion. I was shocked when she went with me to a Kansas concert at the local casino and actually enjoyed it ("the drummer was really good looking for his age"). It's funny that she went to middle school with Jason Newstead (oh the yearbook pictures are priceless) but she wouldn't recognize a Metallica song if it bit her.

Edited by 2112FirstStreet
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My older brother played Rush LOUDLY when he'd zip me around in his car. I was in 6th or 7th grade. I've been a huge fan ever since. I also love other progressive bands and a good mix of other stuff. I pretty much have awesome taste in music. :D
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I was first drawn to Rush in about 1980 when I heard Spirit of Radio somewhat appropriately on the radio. I suppose it was Geddy's voice that caught my attention immediately along with a catchy tune but with music and lyrics that were not mundane. What has kept me interested is the level of musicianship and their willingness to try new ideas and not be content with repeating a tried and tested formula.

For a long time i thought that I would never love another band as much; there are now others that equal them, but none surpass Rush. All of the bands that I love put the music ahead of everything else and don't get involved in rock star antics.

I really don't understand why more women don't like Rush (or indeed rock/prog in general). I am the only fan in my household. My husband and grownup children tolerate my music but don't really like it and I usually end up going to concerts on my own.

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I was first drawn to Rush in about 1980 when I heard Spirit of Radio somewhat appropriately on the radio. I suppose it was Geddy's voice that caught my attention immediately along with a catchy tune but with music and lyrics that were not mundane. What has kept me interested is the level of musicianship and their willingness to try new ideas and not be content with repeating a tried and tested formula.

For a long time i thought that I would never love another band as much; there are now others that equal them, but none surpass Rush. All of the bands that I love put the music ahead of everything else and don't get involved in rock star antics.

I really don't understand why more women don't like Rush (or indeed rock/prog in general). I am the only fan in my household. My husband and grownup children tolerate my music but don't really like it and I usually end up going to concerts on my own.

 

You mean even if your husband hated the music, he wouldn't want to go with just to be there with you? My ex an Irish girl was into dance and hip hop/rap I went with her to Mary J Blige and Jay Z and in turn she went with me to RUSH. it was entertaining to me she knew the words more than the fans at that rap show. She loved the RUSH show because I love RUSH. Even when she wanted to me go to Britney Spears I went and let's just say I was there and enjoyed the crowd and her company.

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I was first exposed to them when I was in a band when I was 17. I loved that they wrote about literature, space and mythology and their lyrics were intelligent. Geddy's bass playing was also a huge thing for me because it reminded me a lot of John Entwistle and Chris Squire, both of whom I admired and wanted to emulate. Over the years my interest had waned a little especially during the synth era. But when S&A's came out it pulled me right back in. Over the past few years I've been reacquainting myself with that synth era and even though I still don't care for Presto, and HYF sounds really dated I'm learning a better appreciation for that time.

 

Also I wanted to say that when I saw them the first time during the Hemispheres tour, that pretty much cinched it. I was about 10 feet away from Geddy in front of the stage and I'll never forget how amazed I was that he could juggle all of the stuff he had to do during the show. It really made me go home and work that much harder on my bass playing.

Edited by EagleMoon
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I was first drawn to Rush in about 1980 when I heard Spirit of Radio somewhat appropriately on the radio. I suppose it was Geddy's voice that caught my attention immediately along with a catchy tune but with music and lyrics that were not mundane. What has kept me interested is the level of musicianship and their willingness to try new ideas and not be content with repeating a tried and tested formula.

For a long time i thought that I would never love another band as much; there are now others that equal them, but none surpass Rush. All of the bands that I love put the music ahead of everything else and don't get involved in rock star antics.

I really don't understand why more women don't like Rush (or indeed rock/prog in general). I am the only fan in my household. My husband and grownup children tolerate my music but don't really like it and I usually end up going to concerts on my own.

 

It was Geddy's voice for me too, right off the bat

 

And I'm a guy ... I'm a musician too, so that makes RUSH all the more interesting, but had they stuck with the more simple style of the first album, I would still love them because of Geddy's voice

 

Their progress was awesome though, don't get me wrong :D

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It was around '82 or '83 when I first heard Rush. I was a big Queen fan back then(and still they are my 2nd favorite) and my first impression was "weird. not my cup of tea". But after several listens, and some time ( a half of the year ) they suddenly hit me like a ton of bricks, didn't know what it really was, their music, song structures, musicianship and especially the lyrics have spoken to me. Though English is not my first language, their messages make me think many things and helped me to develop my thought.

 

I was a bit surprised to know actually there was no line in women's bathroom at the concert though.

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It was around '82 or '83 when I first heard Rush. I was a big Queen fan back then(and still they are my 2nd favorite) and my first impression was "weird. not my cup of tea". But after several listens, and some time ( a half of the year ) they suddenly hit me like a ton of bricks, didn't know what it really was, their music, song structures, musicianship and especially the lyrics have spoken to me. Though English is not my first language, their messages make me think many things and helped me to develop my thought.

 

I was a bit surprised to know actually there was no line in women's bathroom at the concert though.

 

lol

 

I first saw them in 1980, when I was 12 - and I can remember feeling a little intimidated because the crowd was all guys - metalheads - but it was fascinating for me because I was becoming one myself :D

 

You can imagine how cool it was for me 2 years later when I met my first girlfriend at a Judas Priest - Iron Maiden show - and she was the biggest RUSH fan too ....

 

.

 

.

Edited by Lucas
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"Vaginia" Freudian slip too funny.

 

lol

 

I was just about to quote that one

 

classic

 

Actually, I believe that the "Tour Of The Vaginas" occurred somewhere between the Tour Of The Hemispheres and Permanent Waves

:LOL:
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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?
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Eggplant exactly. I would expect it would be for the same reasons. However, I often get a surprised look from men when I say I like Rush, although I think that it is more common now for women to like Rush than back in the day. If you notice some of the women who answered also mentioned that the personality of the guys played into why they like them. I'm not sure that men like musical groups/artists because they are nice ;)
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I was first drawn to Rush in about 1980 when I heard Spirit of Radio somewhat appropriately on the radio. I suppose it was Geddy's voice that caught my attention immediately along with a catchy tune but with music and lyrics that were not mundane. What has kept me interested is the level of musicianship and their willingness to try new ideas and not be content with repeating a tried and tested formula.

For a long time i thought that I would never love another band as much; there are now others that equal them, but none surpass Rush. All of the bands that I love put the music ahead of everything else and don't get involved in rock star antics.

I really don't understand why more women don't like Rush (or indeed rock/prog in general). I am the only fan in my household. My husband and grownup children tolerate my music but don't really like it and I usually end up going to concerts on my own.

 

You mean even if your husband hated the music, he wouldn't want to go with just to be there with you? My ex an Irish girl was into dance and hip hop/rap I went with her to Mary J Blige and Jay Z and in turn she went with me to RUSH. it was entertaining to me she knew the words more than the fans at that rap show. She loved the RUSH show because I love RUSH. Even when she wanted to me go to Britney Spears I went and let's just say I was there and enjoyed the crowd and her company.

I have no complaints - he often drives me to gigs even if he doesn't want to go to them and he has his own interests that I don't get involved with (mostly sport related). I am slowly convincing him of the genius of Rush and Steven Wilson. However persuading him to see King Crimson was a step too far.

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I was waiting to get special treatment at the Rush concerts I went to. Nothing.

 

Except maybe shorter bathroom lines.

What kind of special treatment?...like some prize for being the 10th female that was NOT dragged there by her bf? ;)

 

Meaning I didn't hear one comment about how nice it was to see a woman at a Rush concert, nobody offered to buy me a drink, etc. After all this I have heard about men loving to see women into Rush, I didn't get any sense of that and I saw them 4 times on this last tour.

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Ha Ged's voice is one of the first things that attracted me to their sound, he sings with such emotion, the pitch is countered nicely by the music, and the unusual time signatures love them, I'm not really a musician I just know what I like, and there was something about Rush that really grabbed me. I've liked them through all their phases too. There is something from every decade that I get excited about, I'm just sad I didn't get a chance to see them live sooner than I did.

 

The very same here.....it was Geddys voice that attracted me to the band. The first time I heard RUSH in the mid 70's I had to ask, "what was that, who was that, that guy's voice is funky?" I also wished I was able to see them at least from the Permanent Waves album. They were ALWAYS touring in our area of Maryland and Vaginia. I only FINALLY stepped up to see them in 1984 for the GUP Tour of which I made up for by seeing them multiple times on each tour since.

Excuse me, but where were they always touring? :LOL:

 

HUH, what you talking about?

That place you listed, right after Maryland.

I just noticed it myself... :rfl:

 

I noticed it right away, but I thought he had typed it that way intentionally. Not terribly funny to me either way; sorry.

 

I didn't think it was terribly funny either, especially since that's where I live. But certainly not offended in any way.

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Ha Ged's voice is one of the first things that attracted me to their sound, he sings with such emotion, the pitch is countered nicely by the music, and the unusual time signatures love them, I'm not really a musician I just know what I like, and there was something about Rush that really grabbed me. I've liked them through all their phases too. There is something from every decade that I get excited about, I'm just sad I didn't get a chance to see them live sooner than I did.

 

The very same here.....it was Geddys voice that attracted me to the band. The first time I heard RUSH in the mid 70's I had to ask, "what was that, who was that, that guy's voice is funky?" I also wished I was able to see them at least from the Permanent Waves album. They were ALWAYS touring in our area of Maryland and Vaginia. I only FINALLY stepped up to see them in 1984 for the GUP Tour of which I made up for by seeing them multiple times on each tour since.

Excuse me, but where were they always touring? :LOL:

 

HUH, what you talking about?

That place you listed, right after Maryland.

I just noticed it myself... :rfl:

 

I noticed it right away, but I thought he had typed it that way intentionally. Not terribly funny to me either way; sorry.

 

I didn't think it was terribly funny either, especially since that's where I live. But certainly not offended in any way.

Hey maybe I overdid it slightly... How's this?... :cool:
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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

 

I think the bigger question is why are the majority of fans of "harder" music men, and not women?

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Ha Ged's voice is one of the first things that attracted me to their sound, he sings with such emotion, the pitch is countered nicely by the music, and the unusual time signatures love them, I'm not really a musician I just know what I like, and there was something about Rush that really grabbed me. I've liked them through all their phases too. There is something from every decade that I get excited about, I'm just sad I didn't get a chance to see them live sooner than I did.

 

The very same here.....it was Geddys voice that attracted me to the band. The first time I heard RUSH in the mid 70's I had to ask, "what was that, who was that, that guy's voice is funky?" I also wished I was able to see them at least from the Permanent Waves album. They were ALWAYS touring in our area of Maryland and Vaginia. I only FINALLY stepped up to see them in 1984 for the GUP Tour of which I made up for by seeing them multiple times on each tour since.

Excuse me, but where were they always touring? :LOL:

 

HUH, what you talking about?

That place you listed, right after Maryland.

I just noticed it myself... :rfl:

 

I noticed it right away, but I thought he had typed it that way intentionally. Not terribly funny to me either way; sorry.

 

I didn't think it was terribly funny either, especially since that's where I live. But certainly not offended in any way.

Hey maybe I overdid it slightly... How's this?... :cool:

 

Not a big deal, my friend...different strokes is all. I think I'm probably in the minority, in not thinking it was hilarious...but like I said, no biggie. I've certainly got no trunk with someone who thinks it is...

 

Keep on rockin'. :cool:

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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

 

I think the bigger question is why are the majority of fans of "harder" music men, and not women?

 

Don't know...and it's kind of a slippery slope, in a way. Any reason given as to why would be a generalization, I think.

 

So I say, "Why ask why?"

 

Put on Headlong Flight and fuhgeddaboudit! :cool:

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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

 

I think the bigger question is why are the majority of fans of "harder" music men, and not women?

One word. Testosterone. :cool: Seriously, I have no idea. In my younger days, I longed for a head banging girlfriend, but could only find women who were into bouncy pop music.
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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

 

I think the bigger question is why are the majority of fans of "harder" music men, and not women?

 

Maybe because in general, women are more sensitive/emotional, and as such are more likely to be drawn to love songs and music more of that nature. I'll bet a lot of these women who typically listen to softer music would see that they could enjoy more edgy stuff if they ever actually gave it a fair shake.

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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

The band themselves used to say their audience was 100% male. Maybe in the early days, that's all they saw when they looked out from the stage. Wasn't Ged the one who came up with the term "Geddycorn" because female Rush fans used to be so scarce? Obviously, that's changed over the years. I'm wondering if it's at all related to how the band matured over the years musically (by matured, I mean shorter songs focused on catchy choruses and more reality based lyrics). Maybe for some women, an album like RTB was a more accessible entry point (than say Hemispheres) and they worked their way backward in order to appreciate the early stuff? Just guessing. There probably is no single reason women OR men became attached to the band. Edited by TexMike
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I'm a guy, but I was wondering what the difference would be for a guy getting into rush and a woman getting into rush? For example in my case my sister and I discovered my dad's Roll The Bones CD and BOTH loved it (at the time). This isn't meant to be rude, but why ask women why they got into rush? Wouldn't it be for the same reasons a guy would get into them, because they like the music?

The band themselves used to say their audience was 100% male. Maybe in the early days, that's all they saw when they looked out from the stage. Wasn't Ged the one who came up with the term "Geddycorn" because female Rush fans used to be so scarce? Obviously, that's changed over the years. I'm wondering if it's at all related to how the band matured over the years musically (by matured, I mean shorter songs focused on catchy choruses and more reality based lyrics). Maybe for some women, an album like RTB was a more accessible entry point (than say Hemispheres) and they worked their way backward in order to appreciate the early stuff? Just guessing. There probably is no single reason women OR men became attached to the band.

 

Maybe, but several years later and my sister considers Hemispheres LIGHTYEARS better than Roll the Bones.

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