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workingcinderellaman

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Everything posted by workingcinderellaman

  1. Interesting story about that song. The fame of it broke up Berlin and they didn’t even write it.
  2. Just saw this movie last night and I wasn't disappointed. It's one of those rare instances where the sequel is better than the original. I highly recommend it, especially if you're an airplane geek like I am. They made it using real F-18 footage rather than CGI and it made a huge difference in the quality. Also, try to see it in IMAX with Dolby Atmos if at all possible.
  3. This thread seems to be getting too political for RS. I'm curious why this stuff isn't in SOCN.
  4. Another thing to consider is the ability of the market to adapt under different conditions. For example, if companies have equipment, permits, employees, etc., in place working a fracking well but they're only producing at 50% then if a spike occurs, they can easily increase production. If they don't have those things in place then it may take years to do it. If Canada can increase their oil drilling production in remote areas, but have no way to move it, then their production increase is limited until they have a pipeline or road built to move the oil which could take years.
  5. Lots of people think Old Joe did that but lots of people don't understand how the economy works too. Or gas prices for that matter. No president, left or right, controls them. Dubya, Obama, Trump, Biden...doesn't matter. We're not pretending that energy policy doesn't have a massive impact on supply, are we? It probably does to some extent but has that changed in the last 36 hours to cause gasoline prices to literally go up 45 cents or more in some places? No, what's happened is that the cumulation of bad energy policies coupled with world events have precipitated a historic spike in crude oil. Better energy policies would have made the spike less severe.
  6. I have a nice speaker system in my ski helmet and so in preparing for the upcoming ski season, I'm putting together a skiing playlist and I was wondering if anyone here had any suggestions. It needs to be up-beat and stuff that gets the adrenalin flowing. Stuff like Xanadu, Enter Sandman, Scorpions - Can't live without you, etc. Thanks in advance for any input. :)
  7. I went to this the other night and it really made me miss seeing Rush live.
  8. The science is that so far it has affected one in a million people that have gotten the J and J dose. I don't think it's so hard in the US; we have 2 other alternatives available. Given that we don't yet know how completely the people will recover from the blood clots, it makes sense to pull it here. However, it's going to be hard worldwide to lose a one shot, effective vaccine that some countries were counting on to use in rural and underserved areas. It sets back the vaccine effort a lot, unfortunately. I'm getting pretty tired of this stupid pandemic, it sucks. What is the chance of contracting COVID and dying from it? If it's more than one in a million then on the surface the vaccine would be more beneficial than harmful. I heard someone from the CDC on the news this am and they said that is the purpose of this "pause" in use. They said that during the time the J and J vaccine has been in use, there have been aprox 1 case per million of these blood clots, and aprox 1800 deaths per million from Covid. So, yeah, it seems to come down on the side of the vaccine. Plus the one dose makes it easier for rural and homeless populations to use. I hope that during this time they can figure out a way to still use it- maybe limited to certain ages, or males only or something, because it still seems to have some benefit. So the risk of dying without the vaccine is 1800 times greater than getting it. A lot of stupidity during the pandemic in the name of "abundance of caution".
  9. The science is that so far it has affected one in a million people that have gotten the J and J dose. I don't think it's so hard in the US; we have 2 other alternatives available. Given that we don't yet know how completely the people will recover from the blood clots, it makes sense to pull it here. However, it's going to be hard worldwide to lose a one shot, effective vaccine that some countries were counting on to use in rural and underserved areas. It sets back the vaccine effort a lot, unfortunately. I'm getting pretty tired of this stupid pandemic, it sucks. What is the chance of contracting COVID and dying from it? If it's more than one in a million then on the surface the vaccine would be more beneficial than harmful.
  10. There's a large boulder in waterfront park in Poulsbo, WA, that was dredged out of Liberty Bay. The rock is geologically dissimilar to the bay's bedrock. Why?
  11. I don't post in this part of the forum much because most of my Rush conversations have been exhausted. But, I have a reason to start a thread in here. Two days ago I became a grandfather for the third time! Baby and my daughter-in-law are doing great. My son is a big rush fan and he showed me this which I thought was hilarious. My newborn grandson loves it!
  12. That's not true. I've been posting in there ever since I joined, and I've never been given a strike. Most of the regulars who post in there today know how to deal with things without getting nasty or mean. The idea is to have a meaningful discussion about current events and politics with the result of becoming more enlightened, both about the way others see the world and information that you gain. To me, its an educational experience and a great opportunity to gain understanding into the opinions of others. It's not for everyone, but its' also not the contentious place that many paint it to be. I've made a lot of friends in there, even those who I politically disagree with.
  13. The Washington Post used to publish this graph on their website and mobile app all day, every day. That is, the published it until recently, as the daily numbers continued their distinctive pattern of decline. Now, they have replaced it with a graph showing the states with the largest case increases over the last week, which shows that number in the U.S. as a whole, and five other states. So over the past week, the U.S has had an increase in cases at a rate of 8 per 100,000. Arizona 34 South Carolina 17 Florida 15 Texas 12 Oklahoma 8 This is all per 100,000 people. It seems we've switched from reporting on the number of deaths (because it, thankfully, keeps declining) to the number of new cases, because that has shown an increase. Which is actually good news, if the number of deaths don't go up. That means the mortality rate is going down. The deaths number lags behind the new cases numbers though, which lag two to three weeks behind contracting the virus. What happened two to three weeks ago that could have caused the new cases numbers to spike? I hope the number of deaths, and thus the mortality rate continues to decline. The rate of deaths is going down. Great news! The rate of hospitalization is a mixed bag, depending on the state, apparently. But it is not exploding or rising across the board. This is also good news. Yes it is. But I was specifically talking about the combination of an increased number of new cases coupled with a decreased death rate. Like I say though, it may be too soon to celebrate that because the deaths and hospitalizations could still increase. My gut feeling is that the mortality number is going down though as we learn to deal with it. The information that will be the greatest determinant of deaths is the demographic makeup of the newly infected. That's true. Are there accurate numbers that reflect the demographics of the newly infected?
  14. The Washington Post used to publish this graph on their website and mobile app all day, every day. That is, the published it until recently, as the daily numbers continued their distinctive pattern of decline. Now, they have replaced it with a graph showing the states with the largest case increases over the last week, which shows that number in the U.S. as a whole, and five other states. So over the past week, the U.S has had an increase in cases at a rate of 8 per 100,000. Arizona 34 South Carolina 17 Florida 15 Texas 12 Oklahoma 8 This is all per 100,000 people. It seems we've switched from reporting on the number of deaths (because it, thankfully, keeps declining) to the number of new cases, because that has shown an increase. Which is actually good news, if the number of deaths don't go up. That means the mortality rate is going down. The deaths number lags behind the new cases numbers though, which lag two to three weeks behind contracting the virus. What happened two to three weeks ago that could have caused the new cases numbers to spike? I hope the number of deaths, and thus the mortality rate continues to decline. According to this, hospital resource use, which is a closer leading indicator of deaths, is still flat to decreasing. https://covid19.heal...ates-of-america That's one of the only graphs I've seen that makes the U.S. look good by comparison.
  15. The Washington Post used to publish this graph on their website and mobile app all day, every day. That is, the published it until recently, as the daily numbers continued their distinctive pattern of decline. Now, they have replaced it with a graph showing the states with the largest case increases over the last week, which shows that number in the U.S. as a whole, and five other states. So over the past week, the U.S has had an increase in cases at a rate of 8 per 100,000. Arizona 34 South Carolina 17 Florida 15 Texas 12 Oklahoma 8 This is all per 100,000 people. It seems we've switched from reporting on the number of deaths (because it, thankfully, keeps declining) to the number of new cases, because that has shown an increase. Which is actually good news, if the number of deaths don't go up. That means the mortality rate is going down. The deaths number lags behind the new cases numbers though, which lag two to three weeks behind contracting the virus. What happened two to three weeks ago that could have caused the new cases numbers to spike? I hope the number of deaths, and thus the mortality rate continues to decline. The rate of deaths is going down. Great news! The rate of hospitalization is a mixed bag, depending on the state, apparently. But it is not exploding or rising across the board. This is also good news. Yes it is. But I was specifically talking about the combination of an increased number of new cases coupled with a decreased death rate. Like I say though, it may be too soon to celebrate that because the deaths and hospitalizations could still increase. My gut feeling is that the mortality number is going down though as we learn to deal with it.
  16. The Washington Post used to publish this graph on their website and mobile app all day, every day. That is, the published it until recently, as the daily numbers continued their distinctive pattern of decline. Now, they have replaced it with a graph showing the states with the largest case increases over the last week, which shows that number in the U.S. as a whole, and five other states. So over the past week, the U.S has had an increase in cases at a rate of 8 per 100,000. Arizona 34 South Carolina 17 Florida 15 Texas 12 Oklahoma 8 This is all per 100,000 people. It seems we've switched from reporting on the number of deaths (because it, thankfully, keeps declining) to the number of new cases, because that has shown an increase. Which is actually good news, if the number of deaths don't go up. That means the mortality rate is going down. The deaths number lags behind the new cases numbers though, which lag two to three weeks behind contracting the virus. What happened two to three weeks ago that could have caused the new cases numbers to spike? I hope the number of deaths, and thus the mortality rate continues to decline.
  17. I spend a lot of time in SOCN, so I haven't seen this thread until recently. I haven't read a lot of it but I thought I would repeat a post I made in SOCN. When this whole thing started I pointed out that we have to go through this, one way or the other. Back then I asked the question, what happens when we open up the economy and the pandemic continues where it left off? We would have achieved nothing, I argued, but to trash the economy along with the COIVD pandemic. The response to this concern was that we're only trying to "flatten the curve" to avoid overtaxing our hospitals. I can see the logic in this and I agree with it. We weren't trying to stop the pandemic, but to make it more survivable. It seems that most people have either forgotten that this was the goal of shutting down the economy and social distancing or never knew about it. That goal has been achieved so far. We have flattened the curve, but we're still in the middle of this thing. We aren't going to make the pandemic go away by acting like shut-ins, and even if we did, it would come right back again as soon as we resume even semi-normal economic and social activity. The best we can do is to moderate the damage to the economy while maintaining the ability to keep our hospitals functioning. And we're doing this. But I think we should remember what we're trying to do here. The pandemic will go on until there are enough recovered people to create herd immunity or we develop and implement a working vaccine. The latter won't happen fast enough to prevent the former IMO.
  18. That's a good rule. I should re-post this in SOCN. ;)
  19. Its' such a great song that someone should write a novel based on it. ;) :) It would make a great movie! Let me know if you have any Hollywood connections. http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/grant-brough/the-red-barchetta/hardcover/product-3678792.html
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