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Italians, is it "sauce" or "gravy"?


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#61 Lorraine

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:20 PM

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:03 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 03:15 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 02:55 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 02:17 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 01:18 PM, said:

My mother was off the boat Italian.  She called it sauce.
I have friends that live or lived in the NE. US. and they call it gravy.  My friend just called it gravy the other day.

Seems gravy does have its place, as Sunday gravy usually was cooked with meat.  Slowly cooked meat in the sauce for several hours.  My kids always likes it and i did too growing up.
It could be meatballs, sausage or pieces of pork.
The trick is to brown the meat very good before you add to the sauce. I brown the meat in the pot first, remove, make the sauce and put the meat back in.  Long cook, make some pasta and fresh crusty bread and its all good.

Hey Duff, I grew up watching the frugal gourmet.  But first it was Julia and even the Galloping Gourmet.
I learned many technique from each of them.

A relative was married to an Italian girl who one time told us  either her grandmother or mother used to put crabs in the spaghetti sauce.  We did it (as we had a home on the Bay and crabs and eels were plentiful) and it tasted, believe it or not, very good.  :)

Yep, Its called "enchilado". A red sauce with seafood.  It was a special meal for us.
My mother was raised in Tampa "Ybor City".
They used lots of seafood and blue crabs were the specialty.  All my family made this.  Cleaned up blue crabs (shoulders and claw's) dropped into sauce.
You got to have plenty beer and plenty time to enjoy this dish as it takes forever to eat blue crabs. But its fun and delicious as long as the company is good.

We had "Jersey Blue Crabs" and they were (still are I guess) delicious.  We used to put beer in the boiling water, along with other things, and the beer gave the crabs a good taste.  

Cleaned, no matter what way you ate them, they were delicious. :)

Nothing like East Coast seafood!

You,

Best come here!! :D

The seafood out here doesn't taste the same.  The lobster tastes different and so do the crabs.  Aside from being outrageously expensive ($10 for one Dungenes Crab???).

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#62 troutman

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:26 PM

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 04:20 PM, said:

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:03 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 03:15 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 02:55 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 02:17 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 01:18 PM, said:

My mother was off the boat Italian.  She called it sauce.
I have friends that live or lived in the NE. US. and they call it gravy.  My friend just called it gravy the other day.

Seems gravy does have its place, as Sunday gravy usually was cooked with meat.  Slowly cooked meat in the sauce for several hours.  My kids always likes it and i did too growing up.
It could be meatballs, sausage or pieces of pork.
The trick is to brown the meat very good before you add to the sauce. I brown the meat in the pot first, remove, make the sauce and put the meat back in.  Long cook, make some pasta and fresh crusty bread and its all good.

Hey Duff, I grew up watching the frugal gourmet.  But first it was Julia and even the Galloping Gourmet.
I learned many technique from each of them.

A relative was married to an Italian girl who one time told us  either her grandmother or mother used to put crabs in the spaghetti sauce.  We did it (as we had a home on the Bay and crabs and eels were plentiful) and it tasted, believe it or not, very good.  :)

Yep, Its called "enchilado". A red sauce with seafood.  It was a special meal for us.
My mother was raised in Tampa "Ybor City".
They used lots of seafood and blue crabs were the specialty.  All my family made this.  Cleaned up blue crabs (shoulders and claw's) dropped into sauce.
You got to have plenty beer and plenty time to enjoy this dish as it takes forever to eat blue crabs. But its fun and delicious as long as the company is good.

We had "Jersey Blue Crabs" and they were (still are I guess) delicious.  We used to put beer in the boiling water, along with other things, and the beer gave the crabs a good taste.  

Cleaned, no matter what way you ate them, they were delicious. :)

Nothing like East Coast seafood!

You,

Best come here!! :D

The seafood out here doesn't taste the same.  The lobster tastes different and so do the crabs.  Aside from being outrageously expensive ($10 for one Dungenes Crab???).

That's

How it goes with crab and lobster as far as pricing goes. The numbers are not like fish. But you will never taste any better than from here.

#63 Lorraine

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:46 PM

With you cooking, I believe it, Troutman!  :)

What I miss a lot and have never seen out here is Whiting.

I love Cod but, boy, is it expensive here.

Edited by Lorraine, 07 January 2016 - 04:47 PM.


#64 CygnusX-1Bk2

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 05:41 PM

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 02:55 PM, said:

Yep, Its called "enchilado". A red sauce with seafood...
To us that is more cioppino.. Seafood in red sauce.

#65 1-0-0-1-0-0-1

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 07:18 PM

If these guys call it "sauce," then that's good enough for me.



#66 Lorraine

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:

#67 LedRush

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:32 PM

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:

That lots of Italian Americans do the same?

#68 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:59 PM

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:
Say nothing and give them the finger. They love that kinda stuff

Edited by Tombstone Mountain, 07 January 2016 - 09:00 PM.


#69 JohnnyBlaze

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 02:54 AM

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 07 January 2016 - 08:59 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:
Say nothing and give them the finger. They love that kinda stuff
That's one option. Tell them they are wrong and that they aren't real Italians. They love that kinda stuff even more.

#70 goose

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 03:35 AM

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 01:18 PM, said:

But first it was Julia and even the Galloping Gourmet.
I learned many technique from each of them.
:yes:

#71 liquidcrystalcompass

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 06:51 AM

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:26 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 04:20 PM, said:

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:03 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 03:15 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 02:55 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 02:17 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 01:18 PM, said:

My mother was off the boat Italian.  She called it sauce.
I have friends that live or lived in the NE. US. and they call it gravy.  My friend just called it gravy the other day.

Seems gravy does have its place, as Sunday gravy usually was cooked with meat.  Slowly cooked meat in the sauce for several hours.  My kids always likes it and i did too growing up.
It could be meatballs, sausage or pieces of pork.
The trick is to brown the meat very good before you add to the sauce. I brown the meat in the pot first, remove, make the sauce and put the meat back in.  Long cook, make some pasta and fresh crusty bread and its all good.

Hey Duff, I grew up watching the frugal gourmet.  But first it was Julia and even the Galloping Gourmet.
I learned many technique from each of them.

A relative was married to an Italian girl who one time told us  either her grandmother or mother used to put crabs in the spaghetti sauce.  We did it (as we had a home on the Bay and crabs and eels were plentiful) and it tasted, believe it or not, very good.  :)

Yep, Its called "enchilado". A red sauce with seafood.  It was a special meal for us.
My mother was raised in Tampa "Ybor City".
They used lots of seafood and blue crabs were the specialty.  All my family made this.  Cleaned up blue crabs (shoulders and claw's) dropped into sauce.
You got to have plenty beer and plenty time to enjoy this dish as it takes forever to eat blue crabs. But its fun and delicious as long as the company is good.

We had "Jersey Blue Crabs" and they were (still are I guess) delicious.  We used to put beer in the boiling water, along with other things, and the beer gave the crabs a good taste.  

Cleaned, no matter what way you ate them, they were delicious. :)

Nothing like East Coast seafood!

You,

Best come here!! :D

The seafood out here doesn't taste the same.  The lobster tastes different and so do the crabs.  Aside from being outrageously expensive ($10 for one Dungenes Crab???).

That's

How it goes with crab and lobster as far as pricing goes. The numbers are not like fish. But you will never taste any better than from here.
The oysters in your parts are especially delicious.  Most of the assortments that I paid through the nose for came from Washington state though.

#72 liquidcrystalcompass

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 06:52 AM

View PostJohnnyBlaze, on 08 January 2016 - 02:54 AM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 07 January 2016 - 08:59 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:
Say nothing and give them the finger. They love that kinda stuff
That's one option. Tell them they are wrong and that they aren't real Italians. They love that kinda stuff even more.
:lol:

#73 liquidcrystalcompass

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 06:54 AM

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 04:46 PM, said:

With you cooking, I believe it, Troutman!  :)

What I miss a lot and have never seen out here is Whiting.

I love Cod but, boy, is it expensive here.
I've got an awesome cioppino recipe but you must have saffron to make it complete.  I've got a couple actually.  One is red (saffron is used) and one is more of a white whine/garlic/olive oil/red chili flake recipe.

Edited by liquidcrystalcompass, 08 January 2016 - 06:54 AM.


#74 satchmothesnowdog

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 08:49 AM

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:
Posted Image

#75 Lorraine

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 12:52 PM

View PostJohnnyBlaze, on 08 January 2016 - 02:54 AM, said:

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 07 January 2016 - 08:59 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 07:41 PM, said:

What should I say to the next Italian I meet that calls it gravy?  :unsure:
Say nothing and give them the finger. They love that kinda stuff
That's one option. Tell them they are wrong and that they aren't real Italians. They love that kinda stuff even more.

They would grab me and give me a big hug and say:  Oh-a Lorraine, you are-a so-a funny.

Edited by Lorraine, 08 January 2016 - 05:50 PM.


#76 circumstantial tree

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 01:10 PM

I'm not Italian, but I always called it sauce. The restaurant called "Gravy" considers itself Italian-American. Both my appetizer and entree had mushrooms with a brown sauce.

I'm guessing that it's not wrong to call it gravy, just a matter of preference.

Edited by circumstantial tree, 08 January 2016 - 01:12 PM.


#77 Jaminbenb

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:37 PM

Always been sauce to me... a friend of Sicilian descent referred to it as gravy, though.

#78 goose

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:40 PM

View Postliquidcrystalcompass, on 08 January 2016 - 06:51 AM, said:

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:26 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 04:20 PM, said:

View Posttroutman, on 07 January 2016 - 04:03 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 03:15 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 02:55 PM, said:

View PostLorraine, on 07 January 2016 - 02:17 PM, said:

View PostJohn V, on 07 January 2016 - 01:18 PM, said:

My mother was off the boat Italian.  She called it sauce.
I have friends that live or lived in the NE. US. and they call it gravy.  My friend just called it gravy the other day.

Seems gravy does have its place, as Sunday gravy usually was cooked with meat.  Slowly cooked meat in the sauce for several hours.  My kids always likes it and i did too growing up.
It could be meatballs, sausage or pieces of pork.
The trick is to brown the meat very good before you add to the sauce. I brown the meat in the pot first, remove, make the sauce and put the meat back in.  Long cook, make some pasta and fresh crusty bread and its all good.

Hey Duff, I grew up watching the frugal gourmet.  But first it was Julia and even the Galloping Gourmet.
I learned many technique from each of them.

A relative was married to an Italian girl who one time told us  either her grandmother or mother used to put crabs in the spaghetti sauce.  We did it (as we had a home on the Bay and crabs and eels were plentiful) and it tasted, believe it or not, very good.  :)

Yep, Its called "enchilado". A red sauce with seafood.  It was a special meal for us.
My mother was raised in Tampa "Ybor City".
They used lots of seafood and blue crabs were the specialty.  All my family made this.  Cleaned up blue crabs (shoulders and claw's) dropped into sauce.
You got to have plenty beer and plenty time to enjoy this dish as it takes forever to eat blue crabs. But its fun and delicious as long as the company is good.

We had "Jersey Blue Crabs" and they were (still are I guess) delicious.  We used to put beer in the boiling water, along with other things, and the beer gave the crabs a good taste.  

Cleaned, no matter what way you ate them, they were delicious. :)

Nothing like East Coast seafood!

You,

Best come here!! :D

The seafood out here doesn't taste the same.  The lobster tastes different and so do the crabs.  Aside from being outrageously expensive ($10 for one Dungenes Crab???).

That's

How it goes with crab and lobster as far as pricing goes. The numbers are not like fish. But you will never taste any better than from here.
The oysters in your parts are especially delicious.  Most of the assortments that I paid through the nose for came from Washington state though.
I used to live in Shelton, Washington, home of Oysterfest.  

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#79 invisible airwave

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 11:42 PM

Call it gravy and this quarter Italian on moms side will turn into a hothead faster than you can say Sonny Corleone.




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