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The BBQ thread!


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#21 troutman

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:24 AM

View Postgoose, on 21 April 2015 - 12:30 AM, said:

View Posttroutman, on 20 April 2015 - 11:20 PM, said:

View Postblueschica, on 20 April 2015 - 07:39 PM, said:

Respectfully, what's weird about mushrooms??  A giant portabella stuffed in that burger thing would make it great!!   Posted Image

(I have to deal with mushrooms anyway since Mr. blues is a vegetarian. )  I go for the pulled pork BBQ with the vinegar slaw myself. . . .
Posted Image

Oh yeah!! :ebert:
Throw on a pineapple ring for a Hawaiian touch.

What I like to do is,

Chop it up in to bits and then saute it for about 30 seconds. :D

Edited by troutman, 21 April 2015 - 08:24 AM.


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#22 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

#23 troutman

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:43 AM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM, said:

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

Damn,

Your making me hungry. :ebert:  I need to learn how to do this at some point.

#24 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:52 AM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM, said:

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

:drool: Any BBQ sauces?

#25 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:59 AM

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 08:52 AM, said:

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM, said:

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

:drool: Any BBQ sauces?
of course...
Sweet Baby Ray's and Famous Dave's Devil's Spit

#26 troutman

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 09:03 AM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:59 AM, said:

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 08:52 AM, said:

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM, said:

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

:drool: Any BBQ sauces?
of course...
Sweet Baby Ray's and Famous Dave's Devil's Spit

I don't want to spend a lot on a smoker,

Any suggestions for some thing that is middle of the road but still decent?

#27 Finding IT

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:11 AM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 08:40 AM, said:

I just smoked 14lbs of pork shoulder on Sunday.... apple and hickory chips for over 8 hours. I usually keep it on smoke for about 5-6 hours, mopping with a mix of apple juice, beer and apple cider vinegar every hour. After the 6 hours on smoke, I remove any wood chips, heavy mop the pork and wrap in foil to braise for a few hours.

My parents came over for dinner, we still have a ton left over.

Served with grilled corn on the cob, corn bread, baked beans and chocolate cake :)

Drool on the keyboard.

#28 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:32 AM

Posted Image

Our spicy rib recipe at home:

Sauce is a cocktail of Famous Dave's Devil's Spit, brown sugar, and Southern Comfort. Perfect blend of spicy and sweet.

Rub baby backs in cayenne pepper, crushed red pepper flakes, steak rub, garlic salt
Put them on an oven pan and bathe it with a bottle of cheap beer (usually Steel Reserve or something nobody would ever want to drink), and apple juice
Marinate overnight
Either smoke them or oven cook them in the marinade pan for 3 hours, depends on the day. Both are delicious.
Take them out and sauce them
Finish on the gas grill for an hour, sauce as needed
Pray you don't shit your pants from all the spicy food.

Served with sauteed green beans with diced garlic and bacon

Edited by BowlCity, 21 April 2015 - 11:33 AM.


#29 Finding IT

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

#30 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:53 AM

View PostFinding IT, on 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM, said:

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

A bit of brown sugar for me, though I'm sure honey also works great.

#31 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:38 PM

this is my smoker...
Posted Image

Nothing fancy, just a plain old electric water smoker. I like it because it was fairly cheap ($70 or so at Home Depot) and very consistent. No coals to tend to keep a steady temp. Basically - this is what I do - prep the meat/fish the day before. For pork, I spread a thin layer of mustard on (not a fan of mustard, but you don't taste it much in the final product... it helps with holding the rub and holding that smoke flavor) and then put the rub on.

I smoke pork more than anything, and ribs are the standard 3-2-1 method. (3 hours of smoke, 2 hours wrapped in foil, no smoke, 1 hour out of the foil, no smoke) and for the pork (shoulder or loin are great) I smoke for about 6 hours, then wrap in foil for at least 2 more hours without smoke. Basically the same for brisket too. I also "mop" every hour using a spray bottle filled with beer, apple cider and cider vinegar.

I soak wood chips for a half hour or so, I like apple and hickory with everything but fish - cherry and apple are my favorites for fish. I don't like mesquite - too strong. I put a handful around the heating element, fill the water reservoir with only water (only really needed for moisture, not flavor) and let it go.

#32 Tombstone Mountain

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:42 PM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 12:38 PM, said:

this is my smoker...
Posted Image

Nothing fancy, just a plain old electric water smoker. I like it because it was fairly cheap ($70 or so at Home Depot) and very consistent. No coals to tend to keep a steady temp. Basically - this is what I do - prep the meat/fish the day before. For pork, I spread a thin layer of mustard on (not a fan of mustard, but you don't taste it much in the final product... it helps with holding the rub and holding that smoke flavor) and then put the rub on.

I smoke pork more than anything, and ribs are the standard 3-2-1 method. (3 hours of smoke, 2 hours wrapped in foil, no smoke, 1 hour out of the foil, no smoke) and for the pork (shoulder or loin are great) I smoke for about 6 hours, then wrap in foil for at least 2 more hours without smoke. Basically the same for brisket too. I also "mop" every hour using a spray bottle filled with beer, apple cider and cider vinegar.

I soak wood chips for a half hour or so, I like apple and hickory with everything but fish - cherry and apple are my favorites for fish. I don't like mesquite - too strong. I put a handful around the heating element, fill the water reservoir with only water (only really needed for moisture, not flavor) and let it go.
Very effective pork prep. You're hereby an honorary southern gentleman

#33 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:57 PM

We tried mesquite once and while my Dad liked it, I wasn't too big on it. Very overpowering. Apple is what we use, though our smoker doesn't get as much use as it used to. It's not very good at self managing the coals so it's a pain to keep them at the right temp. We even resorted to drilling a couple small holes into the side to help it out.

#34 Blue J

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 02:28 PM

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 11:53 AM, said:

View PostFinding IT, on 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM, said:

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

A bit of brown sugar for me, though I'm sure honey also works great.

This. ^

Brown sugar works great if you want it just a little bit sweet.

Sweet Baby Ray's, even though it is made in Chicago (and not Texas, or somewhere else in the South...or even Kansas City, which is very fine), has a great hickory and brown sugar sauce.

Of all bottled sauces that I can pick up at the grocery store, my favorites are that, KC Masterpiece original, and Stubb's original. I've never made my own. But damn, I could put BBQ suace on just about anything. :drool:

#35 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 02:40 PM

View PostBlue J, on 21 April 2015 - 02:28 PM, said:

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 11:53 AM, said:

View PostFinding IT, on 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM, said:

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

A bit of brown sugar for me, though I'm sure honey also works great.

This. ^

Brown sugar works great if you want it just a little bit sweet.

Sweet Baby Ray's, even though it is made in Chicago (and not Texas, or somewhere else in the South...or even Kansas City, which is very fine), has a great hickory and brown sugar sauce.

Of all bottled sauces that I can pick up at the grocery store, my favorites are that, KC Masterpiece original, and Stubb's original. I've never made my own. But damn, I could put BBQ suace on just about anything. :drool:

We get KC Masterpiece whenever we're having people over who can't handle the heat, otherwise it's Devil's Spit all the way, though Dave's Rich and Sassy is a great sauce as well. It all gets mixed with a little brown sugar regardless of heat, just for the consistency. Makes the sauce a bit stickier and really helps cook it down into the meat rather than just having it lay on top of it.

#36 Lost In Xanadu

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 02:58 PM

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 02:40 PM, said:

View PostBlue J, on 21 April 2015 - 02:28 PM, said:

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 11:53 AM, said:

View PostFinding IT, on 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM, said:

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

A bit of brown sugar for me, though I'm sure honey also works great.

This. ^

Brown sugar works great if you want it just a little bit sweet.

Sweet Baby Ray's, even though it is made in Chicago (and not Texas, or somewhere else in the South...or even Kansas City, which is very fine), has a great hickory and brown sugar sauce.

Of all bottled sauces that I can pick up at the grocery store, my favorites are that, KC Masterpiece original, and Stubb's original. I've never made my own. But damn, I could put BBQ suace on just about anything. :drool:

We get KC Masterpiece whenever we're having people over who can't handle the heat, otherwise it's Devil's Spit all the way, though Dave's Rich and Sassy is a great sauce as well. It all gets mixed with a little brown sugar regardless of heat, just for the consistency. Makes the sauce a bit stickier and really helps cook it down into the meat rather than just having it lay on top of it.
yeah, the problem with Devil's Spit is the fact it's too runny

#37 BowlCity

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:14 PM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 02:58 PM, said:

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 02:40 PM, said:

View PostBlue J, on 21 April 2015 - 02:28 PM, said:

View PostBowlCity, on 21 April 2015 - 11:53 AM, said:

View PostFinding IT, on 21 April 2015 - 11:51 AM, said:

Thought about BBQ sauce. In 1999 or so, I was travelling alone and I spent a couple hours in a smoke house in Alabama. The Pit Master had won many awards and had just retired from one of the competition circuits. We were talking about sauces and he told me that nearly everyone on the tour cuts their sauce with a sweetener (usually honey). I have asked other folks over the years and they generally agree.

A bit of brown sugar for me, though I'm sure honey also works great.

This. ^

Brown sugar works great if you want it just a little bit sweet.

Sweet Baby Ray's, even though it is made in Chicago (and not Texas, or somewhere else in the South...or even Kansas City, which is very fine), has a great hickory and brown sugar sauce.

Of all bottled sauces that I can pick up at the grocery store, my favorites are that, KC Masterpiece original, and Stubb's original. I've never made my own. But damn, I could put BBQ suace on just about anything. :drool:

We get KC Masterpiece whenever we're having people over who can't handle the heat, otherwise it's Devil's Spit all the way, though Dave's Rich and Sassy is a great sauce as well. It all gets mixed with a little brown sugar regardless of heat, just for the consistency. Makes the sauce a bit stickier and really helps cook it down into the meat rather than just having it lay on top of it.
yeah, the problem with Devil's Spit is the fact it's too runny

:yes:

On the other hand though, it makes Devil's Spit an excellent dipping sauce.

#38 troutman

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:16 PM

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 12:38 PM, said:

this is my smoker...
Posted Image

Nothing fancy, just a plain old electric water smoker. I like it because it was fairly cheap ($70 or so at Home Depot) and very consistent. No coals to tend to keep a steady temp. Basically - this is what I do - prep the meat/fish the day before. For pork, I spread a thin layer of mustard on (not a fan of mustard, but you don't taste it much in the final product... it helps with holding the rub and holding that smoke flavor) and then put the rub on.

I smoke pork more than anything, and ribs are the standard 3-2-1 method. (3 hours of smoke, 2 hours wrapped in foil, no smoke, 1 hour out of the foil, no smoke) and for the pork (shoulder or loin are great) I smoke for about 6 hours, then wrap in foil for at least 2 more hours without smoke. Basically the same for brisket too. I also "mop" every hour using a spray bottle filled with beer, apple cider and cider vinegar.

I soak wood chips for a half hour or so, I like apple and hickory with everything but fish - cherry and apple are my favorites for fish. I don't like mesquite - too strong. I put a handful around the heating element, fill the water reservoir with only water (only really needed for moisture, not flavor) and let it go.

Thanks Bro. :ebert:

#39 Prime Mover and Shaker

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:42 PM

View PostTombstone Mountain, on 21 April 2015 - 12:42 PM, said:

View PostLost In Xanadu, on 21 April 2015 - 12:38 PM, said:

this is my smoker...
Posted Image

Nothing fancy, just a plain old electric water smoker. I like it because it was fairly cheap ($70 or so at Home Depot) and very consistent. No coals to tend to keep a steady temp. Basically - this is what I do - prep the meat/fish the day before. For pork, I spread a thin layer of mustard on (not a fan of mustard, but you don't taste it much in the final product... it helps with holding the rub and holding that smoke flavor) and then put the rub on.

I smoke pork more than anything, and ribs are the standard 3-2-1 method. (3 hours of smoke, 2 hours wrapped in foil, no smoke, 1 hour out of the foil, no smoke) and for the pork (shoulder or loin are great) I smoke for about 6 hours, then wrap in foil for at least 2 more hours without smoke. Basically the same for brisket too. I also "mop" every hour using a spray bottle filled with beer, apple cider and cider vinegar.

I soak wood chips for a half hour or so, I like apple and hickory with everything but fish - cherry and apple are my favorites for fish. I don't like mesquite - too strong. I put a handful around the heating element, fill the water reservoir with only water (only really needed for moisture, not flavor) and let it go.
Very effective pork prep. You're hereby an honorary southern gentleman


I have a similar smoker, but I'm considering upgrading.  I can't add chips without removing the meat, so sometimes I'm low on smoke flavor when all is said and done.  Plus, I'd prefer a front-opening smoker I can see into.

I'm really liking the tri-tips I'm cooking lately.

I've noticed that a strong brine in the water pan can affect flavor a bit, but you're right - it's really more about moisture.

Much more of the flavoring comes from the marinade (which I sometimes inject into the meat), and obviously the rub.

#40 Prime Mover and Shaker

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:44 PM

I'm always futzing with rub recipes.   Really prefer Stubbs sauces.  

I put together a simple overnight marinade that I think worked out very well:  equal parts water, lemon juice (no need for it to be fresh), siracha, and soy sauce.




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