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Do you think of Permanent Waves as a 70s album or an 80s album?


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Poll: Do you think of Permanent Waves as a 70s album or an 80s album (108 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you think of Permanent Waves as a 70s album or an 80s album

  1. Yes - every part of the album was started and finished in the 1970s. (35 votes [32.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 32.41%

  2. Yes - it is more like the prog era music than the synth era music (21 votes [19.44%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.44%

  3. No - it was released on Jan 1, 1980, and I'm a stickler for details (27 votes [25.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.00%

  4. No - it is more like the synth era music than the prof era music (25 votes [23.15%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.15%

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#21 Mika

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 02:16 AM

To me, it represents the biggest change in Rush's sound and direction from a previous album. I think that Hemispheres kind of took Rush as far as they wanted to go in that direction, and Permanent Waves was a real conscious change-of-direction, particularly with the shorter, more radio-friendly songs. The album still has a lot of what fundamentally makes Rush 'Rush', with longer songs with acts ('Natural Science') and copious time meter changes ('Freewill'), but the overall take is of change, a departure from their previously established sound, easing into being a truly 'progressive' band. Geddy's vocals in particular I find different from the previous albums - no more extreme high register such as with Hemispheres (though there is that part in 'Freewill'!), and instead more 'radio-friendly' vocals.

So, to actually answer the question of whether this album is a 70's album or an 80's album: I guess it would fit more into the 80's, to me. It's not 80's as in blending in with Rush's synth output, but it's heading in that direction, and employs a lot of the things that the 80's albums do, with the shorter songs and non-shrieky vocals (and I don't mean 'shrieky vocals' as a bad thing, at all!).

Permanent Waves is the album that closes the door most on the end of an era, if that makes sense. To me, there's no bigger change between two consecutive albums than with Hemispheres and PeW, though some might argue with recent consecutive albums, but this would be obvious because the last few albums have had about five years in between 'em....

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#22 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:23 AM

I love how we can talk about this shit forever

#23 LedRush

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.

#24 rushgoober

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:34 AM

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.

i don't think most people think that, just as i don't think most people share a lot of your musical views.  as far as i'm concerned, each successive decade post-70's has become more and more bleak musically.  and i do actually think there was some brilliant music in the 90's, but it was generally non mainstream genres like ambient, shoegaze and trip-hop, but even those by the mid 90's were losing their luster.  popular music from the 90's, outside of the rare exception, pretty much sucked.  at least popular music in the 80's was fun, if lightweight.  popular music in the 90's was just kind of a downer, and popular music post-90's is pretty vapid.

#25 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:36 AM

how can you guys make such big sweeping statements about ALL music of a certain time period.

#26 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:37 AM

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.
I don't know if anybody thinks this

#27 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:39 AM

I mean if you wanna be ignorant and pretend like iron maiden, husker du, minutemen, saint vitus, black flag, dinosaur jr, Cocteau twins, kate bush, and a ton of other great shit never happened and the 80s were just one big huey lewis song, then I guess it would seem like the 80s sucked. but just because styx and the other rush forum darlings didn't put out anything worth a shit during that decade doesn't mean the 80s sucked

#28 circumstantial tree

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:44 AM

I'd say the first part of the 1990s had some good music, but around 1995 and afterward, it's a series of boy bands and girl bands like Spice Girls. Since then the music has sucked all around insofar as the kind of music that defines any given decade. the 1980s aren't quite as embarrassing.

#29 Lerxster

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:47 AM

I've never thought about this once, and when this thread recedes, I suspect I'll never think about it again.

It's a 70's album released in 1980. :huh: You think it'd have come out by mid-Dec 1979 to take advantage of Christmas, but maybe Rush was making a statement that said the 70's (and fantasy/sci-fi prog by extension) were over by releasing on Jan 1, 1980.

#30 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:51 AM

there's always something good at any point in time, and the late 90s had plenty of good shit if you like hip hop, more extreme forms of metal (not for all the MOTS motley crue lovers), and other things. sure, rush put out their worst record and there wasn't a rock band around that was as good as led zeppelin or something, but you cant judge all music on what came before it. just because a band isn't as good as king crimson doesn't mean they suck

#31 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:55 AM

that's one thing that's ALWAYS annoyed me about this place - the idea that after signals, nothing good was made. I guess it's an age thing.

#32 LedRush

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:57 AM

View Postbathory, on 30 August 2013 - 08:39 AM, said:

I mean if you wanna be ignorant and pretend like iron maiden, husker du, minutemen, saint vitus, black flag, dinosaur jr, Cocteau twins, kate bush, and a ton of other great shit never happened and the 80s were just one big huey lewis song, then I guess it would seem like the 80s sucked. but just because styx and the other rush forum darlings didn't put out anything worth a shit during that decade doesn't mean the 80s sucked

Who is saying that.  Reading comprehension is important.

#33 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:59 AM

"I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close." - LedRush

#34 LedRush

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:59 AM

View Postbathory, on 30 August 2013 - 08:37 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.
I don't know if anybody thinks this

I've never heard someone not say it, but I used hedging languange in case some people hold the other view.

#35 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:00 AM

IMO most of the good 90s music was heavily influenced by the true "brilliance" of 80s bands. take nirvana - without the 80s hardcore and indie bands, they wouldn't have existed.

#36 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:01 AM

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:59 AM, said:

View Postbathory, on 30 August 2013 - 08:37 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.
I don't know if anybody thinks this

I've never heard someone not say it, but I used hedging languange in case some people hold the other view.
eh I guess I'm just different - a lot of my favorite albums are from the 80s, for me it was the best time for punk, metal, pop, a lot of good shit.

#37 LedRush

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:03 AM

View Postrushgoober, on 30 August 2013 - 08:34 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.

i don't think most people think that, just as i don't think most people share a lot of your musical views.  as far as i'm concerned, each successive decade post-70's has become more and more bleak musically.  and i do actually think there was some brilliant music in the 90's, but it was generally non mainstream genres like ambient, shoegaze and trip-hop, but even those by the mid 90's were losing their luster.  popular music from the 90's, outside of the rare exception, pretty much sucked.  at least popular music in the 80's was fun, if lightweight.  popular music in the 90's was just kind of a downer, and popular music post-90's is pretty vapid.

I was speaking about popular music from a rock standpoint.  The 70s and 90s were dominated by popular rock bands, while the 80s had excellent rock bands often obscured by bland pop.  You only need to listen to classic rock stations, which draw the majority of their music from 1967-1977 and 1990-95.  Sure, there's great 80s thrown in, but that wasn't the norm like in the periods I highlight above.

#38 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:05 AM

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 09:03 AM, said:

View Postrushgoober, on 30 August 2013 - 08:34 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:30 AM, said:

View PostRushBoingo, on 30 August 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Well for me, it's 80s all the way, both in date and in sound. One fact I like to boast about Rush is that they kicked off the decade that a lot of people consider to have the most memorable music, and not to mention such a strong testament of a song to kick it off with. Musically it sounds way closer to Moving Pictures than Hemspheres, so I will go with 80s. Though the intro videos for the Time Machine Tour seem to dictate that the band members consider it to be an album from 79 (and moving pictures being from 1980 for that matter). I personally like to look at their albums in pairs rather than quads. They have the Hard Rock, Trio-prog, Synth Prog, Classic rock, Simple Synth, Heavy Synth, Alternative, Heavy Folk Rock, and refined metal combo's. (Feedback not included, Clockwork Angels awaiting duo album name should it come).

I think most people think that the 80s generally had the worst music of the 1960-2000 period.  By far.  Compare to the brilliance of the 70s and 90s, I really don't think it's close.  I haven't given much thought to the 2000s, though.

i don't think most people think that, just as i don't think most people share a lot of your musical views.  as far as i'm concerned, each successive decade post-70's has become more and more bleak musically.  and i do actually think there was some brilliant music in the 90's, but it was generally non mainstream genres like ambient, shoegaze and trip-hop, but even those by the mid 90's were losing their luster.  popular music from the 90's, outside of the rare exception, pretty much sucked.  at least popular music in the 80's was fun, if lightweight.  popular music in the 90's was just kind of a downer, and popular music post-90's is pretty vapid.

I was speaking about popular music from a rock standpoint.  The 70s and 90s were dominated by popular rock bands, while the 80s had excellent rock bands often obscured by bland pop.  You only need to listen to classic rock stations, which draw the majority of their music from 1967-1977 and 1990-95.  Sure, there's great 80s thrown in, but that wasn't the norm like in the periods I highlight above.
oh I thought you meant everything in the 80s was worse than 70s/90s

#39 Slack jaw gaze

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:07 AM

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:59 AM, said:

I've never heard someone not say it, but ...
That phrase will cause a brain reset if you really try and interpret it.

#40 bathory

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:08 AM

View PostSlack jaw gaze, on 30 August 2013 - 09:07 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 30 August 2013 - 08:59 AM, said:

I've never heard someone not say it, but ...
That phrase will cause a brain reset if you really try and interpret it.
every person ledrush meets is compelled to inform him that the 80s had the worst music




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