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#21 Rick N. Backer

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 09:15 AM

View PostLedRush, on 13 January 2021 - 09:42 PM, said:

View PostRick N. Backer, on 13 January 2021 - 09:33 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 13 January 2021 - 07:25 AM, said:

View PostRick N. Backer, on 07 January 2021 - 05:27 PM, said:

View PostTony R, on 07 January 2021 - 02:36 PM, said:

Interesting. I’ve done PowerPoint presentations on my Mac with the Mac OS version of PowerPoint. Never over video conferencing though.

It works fine just using Keynote.  It was the videoconferencing that tripped me up.

I’ve been on Macs since 2007 for personal use, and since 2016 (or so) for work use.  I’ve always used PowerPoint, never had to use Keynote.  I also use Webex (it’s the only one my company allows).  No problems ever.

Yeah, the PowerPoint seemed like it converted, or didn't and just worked, it's not really my area of expertise.  I could share the PowerPoint on WebEx, I just couldn't figure out how to switch to presentation mode.  I had the thumbnails on the left side of my screen, but apparently not on the viewer's.  It's not too tough to trip me up on tech issues.

Where does a Mac store documents?  So, for example, if I'm drafting a letter, now I go into the C drive, pull up a similar letter, copy it, paste it onto a new document, and then edit the new document.  How would that work on a Mac?

For a Mac, the default place for storing documents is the “Documents” folder (crazy, right?).  The default way to access anything on your hard drive is through “Finder”, which should be in your task bar (called your “Dock”) as a default (you can add any application to your task bar by right clicking it and hitting “options” and then “keep in dock”).  When you open “Finder”, you should have several places listed: documents, desktop, recents, photos, music, etc.  When you find your document you can right click it and “Duplicate” (which duplicates it and names the copy whatever the old name was plus the word “copy” at the end) or you can open it, go to “file” (if you’re in Word), and then “save as”.  You can then change the name of the document and the location where it is saved.  The original will not be changed.

:lol:  I haven't used it for documents yet.  I've only done Zoom meetings and the aforementioned PowerPoint.

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#22 LedRush

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 11:55 AM

View PostRick N. Backer, on 14 January 2021 - 09:15 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 13 January 2021 - 09:42 PM, said:

View PostRick N. Backer, on 13 January 2021 - 09:33 AM, said:

View PostLedRush, on 13 January 2021 - 07:25 AM, said:

View PostRick N. Backer, on 07 January 2021 - 05:27 PM, said:

View PostTony R, on 07 January 2021 - 02:36 PM, said:

Interesting. I’ve done PowerPoint presentations on my Mac with the Mac OS version of PowerPoint. Never over video conferencing though.

It works fine just using Keynote.  It was the videoconferencing that tripped me up.

I’ve been on Macs since 2007 for personal use, and since 2016 (or so) for work use.  I’ve always used PowerPoint, never had to use Keynote.  I also use Webex (it’s the only one my company allows).  No problems ever.

Yeah, the PowerPoint seemed like it converted, or didn't and just worked, it's not really my area of expertise.  I could share the PowerPoint on WebEx, I just couldn't figure out how to switch to presentation mode.  I had the thumbnails on the left side of my screen, but apparently not on the viewer's.  It's not too tough to trip me up on tech issues.

Where does a Mac store documents?  So, for example, if I'm drafting a letter, now I go into the C drive, pull up a similar letter, copy it, paste it onto a new document, and then edit the new document.  How would that work on a Mac?

For a Mac, the default place for storing documents is the “Documents” folder (crazy, right?).  The default way to access anything on your hard drive is through “Finder”, which should be in your task bar (called your “Dock”) as a default (you can add any application to your task bar by right clicking it and hitting “options” and then “keep in dock”).  When you open “Finder”, you should have several places listed: documents, desktop, recents, photos, music, etc.  When you find your document you can right click it and “Duplicate” (which duplicates it and names the copy whatever the old name was plus the word “copy” at the end) or you can open it, go to “file” (if you’re in Word), and then “save as”.  You can then change the name of the document and the location where it is saved.  The original will not be changed.

:lol:  I haven't used it for documents yet.  I've only done Zoom meetings and the aforementioned PowerPoint.

Even after using a Mac for 8-9 years for personal use, there was still a learning curve for learning it for work use.  Some things are just different enough to through me off.  But once I learned what I needed to, the Mac worked much better than my Dells or Thinkpads.

#23 LedRush

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 11:59 PM

I just thought of this while opening a WebEx meeting...on my Mac I’ve found that WebEx works much better if you download and install the application rather than use it in a web browser.




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