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Presto: Rush's most awkward era


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#41 jnoble

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 09:47 PM

Their songwriting style got very "safe" in the Hine era. The melodies and structures and recorded performances were fine but they were really holding back compared to the musical chops they showed on the previous albums. It wasn't until Counterparts where they seemed to cut loose and start having fun again (Cut To The Chase & Between Sun and Moon are good examples)

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#42 jnoble

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 09:53 PM

Someone earlier made a good point, Rush always touted their newest album as "the best thing we've ever done". A lot of bands do that fresh out of the studio with new material they're happy with. And then a few years later when they're putting out another new record they'll usually dismiss the earlier album it as "it was OK but we could've done better. THIS album is the one..."
Funny thing about Rush is the albums in the later era of the band they didn't care much for (Presto, Counterparts) I like a lot while the ones they really seemed to love (Snakes, Clockwork) are drinkcoasters at my place I rarely if ever listen to because aside from a handful of songs they're hot garbage


#43 jacklifeson

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 09:50 AM

To each his own, but Presto is probably my least favorite Rush album. When I first heard Show Dont Tell, I was like, hell yeah! It was a cool riff and a dynamic song. There are a few songs I like but overall its not great IMO. Dont love the production either, and if they used the production philosophy from Counterparts (heavier sounding guitars and bass), it would likely have made it better. Again, IMO and YMMV

#44 taurus

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 12:56 PM

I group Rush eras by their live album releases up to T4E, so Presto is in Phase IV and it ranks second in that era

CP/Presto/RTB/T4E are my rankings

I like it but was very happy they moved on from Rupert after the next record.

#45 ytserush

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 06:30 PM

View PostRelayer2112, on 11 July 2019 - 08:08 PM, said:

I think Presto is a great album, though I didn't think so at the time it was released.  I thought it was just ok.  I saw them for the first time on that tour and just remember being really disappointed that they didn't play "Presto".  Afterwards, I wondered if the guitar technology of the time didn't allow for the quick acoustic to electric sound changes needed to play it.  I was overjoyed when I heard they were playing it on the "Time Machine" tour.

As far as Neil's style change, I'm assuming that this was his way of streamlining his part in the recording process by switching over to a more improvisational technique.  Kind of the way they decided after hemispheres that they needed to cut back on the overly complex stuff to maintain their sanity in the studio.

I really wanted to hear Chain Lightning Presto and Available Light. At least we got Presto  21 years later.

I liked Presto when it came out, but I was really preoccupied with Dream Theater in the months before Presto came out.

#46 fraroc

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 05:28 PM

Another era of Rush that's actually pretty awkward isn't really talked about as it's the band's literal apex. Moving Pictures. Again, it's another transitional period for the band. It wasn't quite the 70s prog Rush and it wasn't quite the 80s new wave Rush either. It was something kinda in the middle. While songs like Red Barchetta, Limelight, Tom Sawyer, and Vital Signs are very bass heavy with minimal keyboards, you also had songs like The Camera Eye and Witch Hunt which featured Geddy playing keyboards while singing and substituting bass guitar with synth bass which became a staple on the following four albums.

#47 JohnnyBlaze

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 05:38 PM

View Postjnoble, on 11 July 2019 - 09:53 PM, said:

Funny thing about Rush is the albums in the later era of the band they didn't care much for (Presto, Counterparts) I like a lot while the ones they really seemed to love (Snakes, Clockwork) are drinkcoasters at my place I rarely if ever listen to because aside from a handful of songs they're hot garbage

Everything I’ve read points to them liking Counterparts very much. But yeah, they really seemed to love Snakes and Clockwork. Snakes is neglected and not missed at my place. I skip half of Clockwork but what I don’t skip I really enjoy

#48 Segue Myles

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 05:24 AM

View Postfraroc, on 15 July 2019 - 05:28 PM, said:

Another era of Rush that's actually pretty awkward isn't really talked about as it's the band's literal apex. Moving Pictures. Again, it's another transitional period for the band. It wasn't quite the 70s prog Rush and it wasn't quite the 80s new wave Rush either. It was something kinda in the middle. While songs like Red Barchetta, Limelight, Tom Sawyer, and Vital Signs are very bass heavy with minimal keyboards, you also had songs like The Camera Eye and Witch Hunt which featured Geddy playing keyboards while singing and substituting bass guitar with synth bass which became a staple on the following four albums.

I'd say there is nothing awkward about that era at all. If you look at the band during that time, they were on top of the world with possibly the best album of, not only their career, but that year.

#49 Segue Myles

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 05:24 AM

View PostJohnnyBlaze, on 15 July 2019 - 05:38 PM, said:

View Postjnoble, on 11 July 2019 - 09:53 PM, said:

Funny thing about Rush is the albums in the later era of the band they didn't care much for (Presto, Counterparts) I like a lot while the ones they really seemed to love (Snakes, Clockwork) are drinkcoasters at my place I rarely if ever listen to because aside from a handful of songs they're hot garbage

Everything I’ve read points to them liking Counterparts very much. But yeah, they really seemed to love Snakes and Clockwork. Snakes is neglected and not missed at my place. I skip half of Clockwork but what I don’t skip I really enjoy

Same here.

#50 Todem

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 01:12 PM

Presto is a solid effort. However Power Windows and Hold Your Fire were on a completely different level production wise. The contrast of styles is stark. Personally Hemispheres-HYF is unmatched in terms of Rush. The grand finale of the side long epic albums through the pinnacle of their synth era. The growth, the production value, the playing, arrangements, lyrics...all of it is the pinnacle of Rush.

With Presto we are getting a much lighter side of Rush. They really went contemporary but without all the gloss and production value of Hold Your Fire. I felt like there were some very awkward moments on that album (Anagram, and Super Conductor are by far the weakest tracks of that record). Also I felt some of the lyrics did not fit the musical arrangements smoothly.

Many strong points though on the record to talk about. The opening track Show Don't Tell is a powerhouse of a song that still rings today. The Pass is a fantastic song. The title track has aged incredibly well and was a thrill to hear live on the Time Machine tour. Available Light was always one of my favorite Rush tracks ever since the first time I heard it. That song is so unique for them. Such a shame we never saw it performed live.

Presto is a transitional album indeed. I feel like the album itself has 9 tracks that really stood out and still sounds great today, with two duds (mentioned above).

The interesting thing for me though is the follow up in Roll The Bones is not as consistent as Presto, but the great tracks are truly classics IMO.

Dreamline
Bravado
Roll The Bones
Where's My Thing
Ghost Of A Chance

Just fantastic Rush songs. If I could put an album together of those two it would go like this:


Show Don't Tell
Dreamline
Bravado
Roll The Bones
The Pass
Where's My Thing
Chain Lighting
Ghost Of A Chance
Presto
Available Light

#51 taurus

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 04:33 PM

Quote

Just fantastic Rush songs. If I could put an album together of those two it would go like this:


Show Don't Tell
Dreamline
Bravado
Roll The Bones
The Pass
Where's My Thing
Chain Lighting
Ghost Of A Chance
Presto
Available Light

and that would make a damn fine album

#52 lifeson90

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 06:03 PM

Most awkward era for me was RTB, Great album but the progression just not cutting-edge. Absolutely nothing too new. Suffice to say the awkwardness completely sorted out by Counterparts, the band was back showing the kids how seriously cool they were

Presto wasnt awkward just part a natural progression, rather than a little tired, superb album

#53 lerxt1990

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 09:15 PM

Awkward.

Posted Image

Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by lerxt1990, 18 July 2019 - 09:17 PM.


#54 lerxt1990

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 09:18 PM

Not Awkward.

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#55 fraroc

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 11:26 PM

View Postlerxt1990, on 18 July 2019 - 09:18 PM, said:

Not Awkward.

Posted Image

Well think of it this way. Is Moving Pictures a synth era Rush album or is it a prog era Rush album?

For me, it's both and neither at the same time. It's in a league of its own and thats one of the things that made MP so great

#56 RUSHHEAD666

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:37 AM

"Presto" is one of the greatest albums on the Earth.

Opinions are like assholes.  Everyone has one.

So cliche and yet so true.

Melodic and slick production.  Some of Neil's best lyrics.

Keep smoking that crack rock kids!

"Anagram (For Mongo)" is a masterpiece.  Nice homage to "Blazing Saddles!"  Hello????????

The record is amazing.  Love the keyboards.  Even the keys in "Red Tide."  So melodic.

I guess you so called Rush Fans don't like melody in your music.

Enjoy "Vapor Trails." then.  Pure shite.

#SAFE

JMO!

#57 RUSHHEAD666

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:39 AM

LMAO!!!!!

LIFESON MAKES AMAZING ORGASMS!!!! Well with his fingers on strings!

Edited by RUSHHEAD666, 19 July 2019 - 03:39 AM.


#58 RUSHHEAD666

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:40 AM

View Postjnoble, on 11 July 2019 - 09:47 PM, said:

Their songwriting style got very "safe" in the Hine era. The melodies and structures and recorded performances were fine but they were really holding back compared to the musical chops they showed on the previous albums. It wasn't until Counterparts where they seemed to cut loose and start having fun again (Cut To The Chase & Between Sun and Moon are good examples)

"Counterparts" is the last great Rush record.

#59 lerxt1990

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:24 PM

View Postfraroc, on 18 July 2019 - 11:26 PM, said:

View Postlerxt1990, on 18 July 2019 - 09:18 PM, said:

Not Awkward.

Posted Image

Well think of it this way. Is Moving Pictures a synth era Rush album or is it a prog era Rush album?

For me, it's both and neither at the same time. It's in a league of its own and thats one of the things that made MP so great

It was definitely stage one..or 0.9... and Vital Signs, last track, ushered in the full synth era imo.

#60 lerxt1990

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:25 PM

View PostRUSHHEAD666, on 19 July 2019 - 03:40 AM, said:

View Postjnoble, on 11 July 2019 - 09:47 PM, said:

Their songwriting style got very "safe" in the Hine era. The melodies and structures and recorded performances were fine but they were really holding back compared to the musical chops they showed on the previous albums. It wasn't until Counterparts where they seemed to cut loose and start having fun again (Cut To The Chase & Between Sun and Moon are good examples)

"Counterparts" is the last great Rush record.

I remember listening to that album and thinking the hard rockers are back :)




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