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The language Nazi... These words are NOT verbs.... yet

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#61 HemiBeers

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 12:06 PM

I really think I should email this to everyone at 8am on Monday. I guarantee that it would start everyone's day off right. Well except the prudes and the PC assholes who are in charge which would get me fired.

https://www.youtube....h?v=QjYQHuAmW0E

Well, it is 'work' related right?

I swear I'm sending this in an email on my last day before I walk out.

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#62 metallithrax

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 04:19 AM

Init/innit.

f***ing hate the use of this as 99% of the time it doesn't make any sense.

person 1 - Good game last night.
person 2 - Init

Makes no sense at all

Person 1 - This is a good game
Person 2 - Init

Does actually make sense, but still irritates me

#63 Fridge

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 08:38 AM

View PostHemiBeers, on 22 September 2018 - 12:06 PM, said:

I really think I should email this to everyone at 8am on Monday. I guarantee that it would start everyone's day off right. Well except the prudes and the PC assholes who are in charge which would get me fired.

https://www.youtube....h?v=QjYQHuAmW0E

Well, it is 'work' related right?

I swear I'm sending this in an email on my last day before I walk out.

That's hardly NSFW!.....where are you employed?...a Benedictine Monastery?

#64 MalformedEarthborn

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 11:52 PM

Why am I just finding this thread now???

I hate when people use "rockstar" as an adjective.

"I had a really rockstar burrito bowl for lunch, bruh!"

#65 Weakly Criminal

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 12:03 AM

Has anyone noticed the dropping of D's ?

Cou' ant
Wou' ant
Shou' ant

The Brits seem eaten up with it.

#66 New_World_Man

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 05:08 PM

Something that I try not to do but hear it a lot is the misuse of the words "I mean." Younger people say it at the beginning of almost every sentence it seems. I think people say it to fill in the gap when they want to say something but haven't yet figured out what they are going to say. It's like when people start a sentence with "So" as in "so, I've been working on this new project." Why can't you just say you are working on a new project.

#67 Principled Man

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 06:28 PM

View PostNew_World_Man, on 09 February 2019 - 05:08 PM, said:

Something that I try not to do but hear it a lot is the misuse of the words "I mean." Younger people say it at the beginning of almost every sentence it seems. I think people say it to fill in the gap when they want to say something but haven't yet figured out what they are going to say. It's like when people start a sentence with "So" as in "so, I've been working on this new project." Why can't you just say you are working on a new project.

Our current version of the English language is neck-deep in bad grammar, slang, vulgarities and other irrelevant words and phrases.  

We should be more like Vulcans.  They speak clearly, simply and concisely.  :lol:

#68 Citizen of the World

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:42 PM

It isn't just misuse of words that annoys me. It's inflection too. Why are so many people raising the tone of their voice at the end of a sentence? It sounds like they are asking a question. This comes from people who are spokespeople for companies too, who should know better.

#69 goose

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 05:47 PM

View PostCitizen of the World, on 09 February 2019 - 10:42 PM, said:

It isn't just misuse of words that annoys me. It's inflection too. Why are so many people raising the tone of their voice at the end of a sentence? It sounds like they are asking a question. This comes from people who are spokespeople for companies too, who should know better.
The high rising terminal, or "up-talking".  It's when you make a stateMENT, but phrase it like a quesTION.  I can't stand it, and NPR is absolutely infected with it.

But don't express that opinion to anyone, because it's considered a misogynistic micro-aggression...

https://www.npr.org/...g-womens-voices

From Upspeak To Vocal Fry: Are We 'Policing' Young Women's Voices?

Journalist Jessica Grose is no stranger to criticism of her voice. When she was co-hosting the Slate podcast, the DoubleX Gabfest, she would receive emails complaining about her "upspeak" — a tendency to raise her voice at the end of sentences. Once an older man she was interviewing for an article in Businessweek told her that she sounded like his granddaughter.

But linguistics professor Penny Eckert argues that women shouldn't have to change their voices to suit society...

[And this...]

I was shocked the first time I heard this style [upspeak] on NPR. I thought, "Oh my god, how can this person be talking like this on the radio?" Then I played it for my students, and I said, "How does she sound?" and they said, "Good, authoritative." And that was when I knew that I had a problem. ... That I was not a part of the generation that understood what that style means. ... There's been a change and those of us who are bothered by some of these features are probably just getting old.

:codger:

Edited by goose, 10 February 2019 - 05:50 PM.


#70 JARG

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 02:35 PM

View Postgoose, on 10 February 2019 - 05:47 PM, said:

View PostCitizen of the World, on 09 February 2019 - 10:42 PM, said:

It isn't just misuse of words that annoys me. It's inflection too. Why are so many people raising the tone of their voice at the end of a sentence? It sounds like they are asking a question. This comes from people who are spokespeople for companies too, who should know better.
The high rising terminal, or "up-talking".  It's when you make a stateMENT, but phrase it like a quesTION.  I can't stand it, and NPR is absolutely infected with it.

The Andy Griffith show must be on your "do not watch" list. I noticed "up-talking" quite a bit by the natives when I lived in NC.

#71 Fridge

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 03:09 PM

View Postgoose, on 10 February 2019 - 05:47 PM, said:

View PostCitizen of the World, on 09 February 2019 - 10:42 PM, said:

It isn't just misuse of words that annoys me. It's inflection too. Why are so many people raising the tone of their voice at the end of a sentence? It sounds like they are asking a question. This comes from people who are spokespeople for companies too, who should know better.
The high rising terminal, or "up-talking".  It's when you make a stateMENT, but phrase it like a quesTION.  I can't stand it, and NPR is absolutely infected with it.

But don't express that opinion to anyone, because it's considered a misogynistic micro-aggression...

https://www.npr.org/...g-womens-voices

From Upspeak To Vocal Fry: Are We 'Policing' Young Women's Voices?

Journalist Jessica Grose is no stranger to criticism of her voice. When she was co-hosting the Slate podcast, the DoubleX Gabfest, she would receive emails complaining about her "upspeak" — a tendency to raise her voice at the end of sentences. Once an older man she was interviewing for an article in Businessweek told her that she sounded like his granddaughter.

But linguistics professor Penny Eckert argues that women shouldn't have to change their voices to suit society...

[And this...]

I was shocked the first time I heard this style [upspeak] on NPR. I thought, "Oh my god, how can this person be talking like this on the radio?" Then I played it for my students, and I said, "How does she sound?" and they said, "Good, authoritative." And that was when I knew that I had a problem. ... That I was not a part of the generation that understood what that style means. ... There's been a change and those of us who are bothered by some of these features are probably just getting old.

:codger:

It's got nothing to do with gender.....when I was in Australia, just about every man and his dog did it.....made me want to reach for the nearest baseball bat.

#72 Principled Man

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 03:46 PM

View PostFridge, on 11 February 2019 - 03:09 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 10 February 2019 - 05:47 PM, said:

View PostCitizen of the World, on 09 February 2019 - 10:42 PM, said:

It isn't just misuse of words that annoys me. It's inflection too. Why are so many people raising the tone of their voice at the end of a sentence? It sounds like they are asking a question. This comes from people who are spokespeople for companies too, who should know better.
The high rising terminal, or "up-talking".  It's when you make a stateMENT, but phrase it like a quesTION.  I can't stand it, and NPR is absolutely infected with it.

But don't express that opinion to anyone, because it's considered a misogynistic micro-aggression...

https://www.npr.org/...g-womens-voices

From Upspeak To Vocal Fry: Are We 'Policing' Young Women's Voices?

Journalist Jessica Grose is no stranger to criticism of her voice. When she was co-hosting the Slate podcast, the DoubleX Gabfest, she would receive emails complaining about her "upspeak" — a tendency to raise her voice at the end of sentences. Once an older man she was interviewing for an article in Businessweek told her that she sounded like his granddaughter.

But linguistics professor Penny Eckert argues that women shouldn't have to change their voices to suit society...

[And this...]

I was shocked the first time I heard this style [upspeak] on NPR. I thought, "Oh my god, how can this person be talking like this on the radio?" Then I played it for my students, and I said, "How does she sound?" and they said, "Good, authoritative." And that was when I knew that I had a problem. ... That I was not a part of the generation that understood what that style means. ... There's been a change and those of us who are bothered by some of these features are probably just getting old.

:codger:

It's got nothing to do with gender.....when I was in Australia, just about every man and his dog did it.....made me want to reach for the nearest baseball bat.

Where I live, in Wisconsin, the vast majority of "upspeakers" are female.  I guess it depends on where you live.  

Quote

But linguistics professor Penny Eckert argues that women shouldn't have to change their voices to suit society...

I wonder if she would say the same thing about macho men and their direct, get to the point, "don't waste my time with irrelevancies" voices.  ;) ;)

#73 toymaker

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 02:39 PM

Most of these problems, like, stem from . . . ummmm . . . lack of confidence?

#74 Weakly Criminal

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:13 PM

View PostNew_World_Man, on 09 February 2019 - 05:08 PM, said:

Something that I try not to do but hear it a lot is the misuse of the words "I mean." Younger people say it at the beginning of almost every sentence it seems. I think people say it to fill in the gap when they want to say something but haven't yet figured out what they are going to say. It's like when people start a sentence with "So" as in "so, I've been working on this new project." Why can't you just say you are working on a new project.

The verbal pause to complete a thought. Probably the worst of these is you know, like, I mean it's probably something I still haven't been able to think of.




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