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Why did 70s prog rock bands turn to new wave in the 80s as a sound change?


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#1 fraroc

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 12:45 PM

My question is...I wonder what was the attraction that bands like Yes, Rush, Genesis, and Jethro Tull had to that sort of Kraftwerk/Gary Numan-esque sound?

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#2 bluefox4000

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 12:50 PM

Change?  bored with prog?

who really knows.

Prog was also not that cool in the 80's.  it was like.....fossil old.

then the 90's popped up and a bit of a revival hit.

Mick

#3 tangy

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 12:58 PM

View Postfraroc, on 05 March 2018 - 12:45 PM, said:

My question is...I wonder what was the attraction that bands like Yes, Rush, Genesis, and Jethro Tull had to that sort of Kraftwerk/Gary Numan-esque sound?

Big money

#4 Digital Dad

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:01 PM

When ELP turned into the BeeGees and Jon Anderson left Yes.

#5 bluefox4000

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:03 PM

View PostDigital Dad, on 05 March 2018 - 01:01 PM, said:

When ELP turned into the BeeGees and Jon Anderson left Yes.

i love the bee Gees but man did that suck

lol

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#6 Rick N. Backer

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:33 PM

I actually think Yes and Genesis got better when they changed their sound in the early 80s.  I don't think Tull did all that much, although I admittedly don't follow them as closely.

Rush, of course, peaked in the early 80s and then . . .

#7 toymaker

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:54 PM

They listened to the radio.

They had money to invest in the new musical toys.

They mistakenly believed they had exhausted the musical possibilities of their existing format.

#8 Lucas

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 02:24 PM

Alex had an expensive cocaine habit

#9 custom55

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 02:57 PM

They also changed their hair styles as well.  awful

Edited by custom55, 05 March 2018 - 02:57 PM.


#10 bluefox4000

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:02 PM

For the record i think some bands made the change over better than others.

i loved Genesis and Rush in that era.  but think Yes completely went off the rails.

Mick

#11 toymaker

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:29 PM

Under Wraps is a weird album for me - love the tunes but hate the sounds.

#12 Bigbobby10

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:34 PM

I would say their success mostly. Prog rock was popular in the 70's but by mid 80s, very few successful prog bands, they all went commercial.

Which isn't really a bad thing to me.

#13 J2112YYZ

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:38 PM

They were just trying to stay relevant with the musical times. Rush and Genesis would have sounded very dated and nosedived into obscurity very quickly if they didn't do what they did. Also, it was their job and I'm guessing they wanted to make some money. Sounding like you belong in the modern music landscape is a good way to do that.

#14 bluefox4000

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:41 PM

View PostJ2112YYZ, on 05 March 2018 - 03:38 PM, said:

They were just trying to stay relevant with the musical times. Rush and Genesis would have sounded very dated and nosedived into obscurity very quickly if they didn't do what they did. Also, it was their job and I'm guessing they wanted to make some money. Sounding like you belong in the modern music landscape is a good way to do that.

times 2.  it was adapt or sink really.

i would do the same......just being honest, lol

Mick

#15 Bigbobby10

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:56 PM

I feel like also creativity in a band can only go so far with progressive rock music (or any genre). I think if they stuck with it, it would sound like copies of their previous works. The change in style of music may have revived bands and made them want to create more music.

But that's just my thought

Edited by Bigbobby10, 05 March 2018 - 03:56 PM.


#16 Bigbobby10

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:57 PM

View PostBigbobby10, on 05 March 2018 - 03:56 PM, said:

I feel like also creativity in a band can only go so far with progressive rock music (or any genre). I think if they stuck with it, it would sound like copies of their previous works. The change in style of music may have revived bands and made them want to create more music.

But that's just my thought

I think the best example of this is Miles Davis, he would always change his music to stay relevant, but also experimenting into many genre's of music. That's why he is one of the best musicians ever

#17 bluefox4000

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 04:01 PM

And i couldn't care less how good you are in a certain area of music.  EVERYTHING goes stale eventually and i will find a more interesting band, lol

Mick

Edited by bluefox4000, 05 March 2018 - 11:02 PM.


#18 JohnnyBlaze

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 08:21 PM

Progressive bands were more likely to experiment with different sounds. And naturally, they’d gravitate towards what they thought were the interesting sounds of the day.

I remember Geddy & Alex interviews in rock magazines in those days and they were mentioning bands like The Fixx and Talk Talk as who they thought were fascinating.

All of those progressive bands had crossover tendencies. But they just did their thing as journalists tried to give them music labels/genres while listeners usually accepted those labels. Still do.

Rock, metal, pop, progressive pop, alternative rock, bla bla bla................. :hail:

#19 Entre_Perpetuo

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:49 PM

90125, Pew through Signals (or through PoW/HYF if you're really into it), Abacab and Genesis s/t are all explanation enough in my mind. By the end of the 70s, most of the prog bands had stopped being able to make "classic" prog that was both great and groundbreaking, and when punk and new wave kicked in and made prog look like dinosaur music to the masses, the idea of changing styles, even jumping genres, became all the more lucrative. Not to mention, these guys weren't exactly old when prog's time in the limelight came to a close. Sure they'd already had a lot of great music and albums to their names, but they weren't old enough to lose all interest in the times, and especially Rush and Genesis were captivated by the possibilities new wave brought to their music. Besides, just because these bands hopped on the new wave train didn't mean they'd abandoned their roots. Would Blondie or The Cars have released anything as weird and convoluted as Dodo/Lurker? Could The Talking Heads have written Marathon? Prog bands being in the new wave scene actually brought some really interesting and innovative ideas to the table.

#20 goose

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 12:03 AM

View PostRick N. Backer, on 05 March 2018 - 01:33 PM, said:

I don't think Tull did all that much, although I admittedly don't follow them as closely.


View Posttoymaker, on 05 March 2018 - 03:29 PM, said:

Under Wraps is a weird album for me - love the tunes but hate the sounds.
Yeah, Under Wraps is a strange one.  It was the times, as others have pointed out, including  Ian himself in this clip from A Little Light Music.   He also makes your point about the songs being good when not played with the synths...






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