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#1 workingcinderellaman

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:00 PM

My future son-in-law has one of these and was showing me all of the cool stuff it can do. So, what I was wondering is if anyone out there has had any experience with the Rasberry Pi. What I want to do is to use it to run the RGB individually addressable LED strips.

I have this cool idea I want to try on a wedding cake.

Edited by workingcinderellaman, 28 February 2018 - 01:01 PM.


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#2 Babycat

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 04:37 PM

Mmm... pi....  :drool:

#3 LedRush

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:13 AM

My friend gave me one near Christmas...it has about 22,000 retro games on virtually every console from the 2600 to the the Nintendo 64.  It's awesome.

#4 launchpad67a

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 01:44 PM

Yes it can be done no problem. The Raspberry Pi's can run just about anything. I've used them to run led video panels/walls for show production, and media servers. I don't have any personal experience doing what you are trying to with the thin led strips, but it can totally be done.

I can think of a few things you should be aware of when running led strips:
*Length of run may require a stand-alone power supply.
*Some led strips have 2 data lines, and these will give you much better control over individual effects. The dual-line ones are more expensive but better.

Here's a decent tutorial: https://tutorials-ra...-rgb-led-strip/

#5 workingcinderellaman

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:23 PM

View Postlaunchpad67a, on 01 March 2018 - 01:44 PM, said:

Yes it can be done no problem. The Raspberry Pi's can run just about anything. I've used them to run led video panels/walls for show production, and media servers. I don't have any personal experience doing what you are trying to with the thin led strips, but it can totally be done.

I can think of a few things you should be aware of when running led strips:
*Length of run may require a stand-alone power supply.
*Some led strips have 2 data lines, and these will give you much better control over individual effects. The dual-line ones are more expensive but better.

Here's a decent tutorial: https://tutorials-ra...-rgb-led-strip/
Thanks. That's really helpful.  I really like the addressable LED strips. It looks like you use an external 5volt power supply so you don't have to worry about loading up the raspberry. That actually looks really easy. The hard part will be programming it.

#6 workingcinderellaman

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:28 PM

View PostLedRush, on 01 March 2018 - 10:13 AM, said:

My friend gave me one near Christmas...it has about 22,000 retro games on virtually every console from the 2600 to the the Nintendo 64.  It's awesome.
My future son-in-law has one of these for his:

Posted Image

He has a ton of emulators in it for many of the Sega, Nintendo, SuperNES, and Nintendo 64. I was never into home video games so I was mildly interested in it. But then he got a few of the arcade emulators. That was fun. But there aren't many arcade emulators that actually work.

#7 KenJennings

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:48 PM

I used the same software used to make the retropie consoles to build this for a workplace halloween pumpkin contest last year. The most difficult part of this was tuning the low quality LCD screen to actually function with the emulator. But it ended up surprisingly playable.

Posted Image

I've also made retropie consoles for a few of my friends... Even overclocked it so that it could run N64 games reasonably well. I especially enjoy the PS1 emulator, but I wish the game isos didn't take up so much space on the memory card.

Edited by KenJennings, 01 March 2018 - 03:50 PM.


#8 KenJennings

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:51 PM

double post

Edited by KenJennings, 01 March 2018 - 09:10 PM.


#9 workingcinderellaman

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 04:49 PM

View PostKenJennings, on 01 March 2018 - 03:48 PM, said:

I used the same software used to make the retropie consoles to build this for a workplace halloween pumpkin contest last year. The most difficult part of this was tuning the low quality LCD screen to actually function with the emulator. But it ended up surprisingly playable.

Posted Image

I've also made retropie consoles for a few of my friends... Even overclocked it so that it could run N64 games reasonably well. I especially enjoy the PS1 emulator, but I wish the game isos didn't take up so much space on the memory card.
That's pretty cool!

Do you know of any tricks to get the arcade emulators to work? We can't seem to get most of them to work well.

Edited by workingcinderellaman, 01 March 2018 - 04:49 PM.


#10 LedRush

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 07:16 PM

View Postworkingcinderellaman, on 01 March 2018 - 04:49 PM, said:

View PostKenJennings, on 01 March 2018 - 03:48 PM, said:

I used the same software used to make the retropie consoles to build this for a workplace halloween pumpkin contest last year. The most difficult part of this was tuning the low quality LCD screen to actually function with the emulator. But it ended up surprisingly playable.

Posted Image

I've also made retropie consoles for a few of my friends... Even overclocked it so that it could run N64 games reasonably well. I especially enjoy the PS1 emulator, but I wish the game isos didn't take up so much space on the memory card.
That's pretty cool!

Do you know of any tricks to get the arcade emulators to work? We can't seem to get most of them to work well.

Mine don’t work that well either...about half work.

#11 LedRush

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 07:17 PM

View PostKenJennings, on 01 March 2018 - 03:48 PM, said:

I used the same software used to make the retropie consoles to build this for a workplace halloween pumpkin contest last year. The most difficult part of this was tuning the low quality LCD screen to actually function with the emulator. But it ended up surprisingly playable.

Posted Image

I've also made retropie consoles for a few of my friends... Even overclocked it so that it could run N64 games reasonably well. I especially enjoy the PS1 emulator, but I wish the game isos didn't take up so much space on the memory card.

That is so awesome!  And the Sega version, no less!

#12 KenJennings

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:18 PM

Unfortunately, I've haven't really tried any arcade emulators yet. But I love tinkering with this kind of stuff.

The next project I've been thinking about is taking apart an old electronic dart board, and seeing if I could connect its switches to either a Pi or an Ardunio; then writing software that calculates your score on either a dedicated monitor or a TV... the eventual goal of the project would be to construct two units, allowing an online connection, so you could play a friend at darts over the internet.

My brother and I have also been working on a prototype tip-up for ice fishing that immediately sends your cellphone a message, and triggers a chime, via Bluetooth- as soon as a fish hits your line.

Edited by KenJennings, 01 March 2018 - 09:19 PM.


#13 KenJennings

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:21 PM

In fact WCM, thinking about your project, the Ardunio microcomputer might be a better solution for you than the Pi- its a little bit simpler and focused on executing basic repetitive commands like triggering a light or a switch, without the demands of a full featured computer.

#14 launchpad67a

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 11:01 PM

View PostKenJennings, on 01 March 2018 - 09:21 PM, said:

In fact WCM, thinking about your project, the Ardunio microcomputer might be a better solution for you than the Pi- its a little bit simpler and focused on executing basic repetitive commands like triggering a light or a switch, without the demands of a full featured computer.
Nice! I was going to recommend the Arduino as well. It's designed to do what he needs. I think the per-configured system might be worth it for this application, although I have not used it before.
Check it out: https://www.arduino.cc/

#15 workingcinderellaman

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 09:19 AM

View Postlaunchpad67a, on 01 March 2018 - 11:01 PM, said:

View PostKenJennings, on 01 March 2018 - 09:21 PM, said:

In fact WCM, thinking about your project, the Ardunio microcomputer might be a better solution for you than the Pi- its a little bit simpler and focused on executing basic repetitive commands like triggering a light or a switch, without the demands of a full featured computer.
Nice! I was going to recommend the Arduino as well. It's designed to do what he needs. I think the per-configured system might be worth it for this application, although I have not used it before.
Check it out: https://www.arduino.cc/
I played around with Arduino years ago when I made my first hexcopter. It was before drones were all the rage. I haven't done anything with it since but that's a great idea.




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