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What artists did you discover because of their influence *on* Rush?


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#1 zappafrank

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 10:52 PM

I recently started exploring some Ultravox because Neil specifically cited them as a band that caught his attention and drove how he started to approach rhythm (especially electronic) in the early 80's.

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#2 toymaker

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 11:11 PM

I bought a Blue Cheer CD . . . I wasn't blown away by it, though.

#3 Entre_Perpetuo

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:28 AM

None, I was aware of most of the bands that inspired Rush prior to getting into Rush.

Actually I suppose I did try out Yes and Iron Maiden only after starting on Rush, but I started listening to Yes so soon after Rush that they were really at the same time, and I would've found Yes regardless of whether or not my dad had told me they were like Rush and I should check them out. Also, the first time I tried Iron Maiden was, yes, because my dad said they were like the next level after Rush, but they didn't even come close to clicking with me (I liked two of their songs, and only liked) until just this past summer when I listened through The Number Of The Beast, which I only did because I'd gotten into metal and now needed to know what all the fuss was about.

I suppose I may not have ever heard Triumph without being into Rush...but then I only know like two of their songs still and it's been years since I first heard them...

#4 RushFanForever

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 05:12 AM

For me, it's the Canadian prog-rock counterpart FM.

I've really been listening to FM a lot as of late.

As well, through my local library I've been reading a lot of archived articles on the band, especially Ben Mink's involvement as a member.


Edited by RushFanForever, 31 January 2018 - 05:20 AM.


#5 bluefox4000

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:57 AM

Can't say many at all.

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#6 clintonb

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:44 PM

I read that Rush was sort of like a mix of Yes and Led Zeppelin.  So I checked those bands out too, liked them, and bought all their albums too.

#7 LeaveMyThingAlone

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:27 PM

All the usual bands influenced them...The Who, Zeppelin, Yes, Cream, Pink Floyd to a lesser degree. They all have their strengths, but Rush created their own sound that touched on all of it, which is what made them so special.
As Gene Simmons once said, "How do you describe Rush? It's RUSH"

Edited by LeaveMyThingAlone, 31 January 2018 - 01:28 PM.


#8 RushFanForever

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:45 PM

Also Neil Peart mentioned the band Japan and their album 'Tin Drum' (1981) was influential on him from the 1992 drum clinic he did below.



I enjoyed the 'Tin Drum' album, which was a good listening experience.

#9 ytserush

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:19 PM

Can't think of any. Any that I can think of I came up with independently of Rush.

Oh wait....Jeff Berlin. That was a direct link.

#10 jamie

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 11:53 PM

yes, primus, i dug more into pink floyd. that's all i can think of lol. i've discovered more bands who have been inspired by Rush.

#11 Tony R

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 07:23 AM

View PostRushFanForever, on 31 January 2018 - 01:45 PM, said:

Also Neil Peart mentioned the band Japan and their album 'Tin Drum' (1981) was influential on him from the 1992 drum clinic he did below.



I enjoyed the 'Tin Drum' album, which was a good listening experience.

Plus Richard Barbieri of Porcupine Tree fame was in Japan.

Not sure Rush were influenced by FM, certainly the band wasn’t formed until 1976, but certainly they one of the groups I explored because of their connection to Rush.


#12 Tony R

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 07:26 AM

View PostLeaveMyThingAlone, on 31 January 2018 - 01:27 PM, said:

All the usual bands influenced them...The Who, Zeppelin, Yes, Cream, Pink Floyd to a lesser degree. They all have their strengths, but Rush created their own sound that touched on all of it, which is what made them so special.
As Gene Simmons once said, "How do you describe Rush? It's RUSH"
The first album is almost a homage to Led Zepellin. Big chunks of FBN and CoS too. 2112 was clearly influenced by the Who’s Tommy.

#13 RushFanForever

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 08:12 AM

Great posts from others.

Edited by RushFanForever, 01 February 2018 - 08:14 AM.


#14 RushFanForever

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 08:13 AM

View PostTony R, on 01 February 2018 - 07:23 AM, said:


Not sure Rush were influenced by FM, certainly the band wasn’t formed until 1976, but certainly they one of the groups I explored because of their connection to Rush.

FM was a musical inspiration to RUSH during the 'Signals' era in my opinion.

Songs such as 'Random Harvest' and 'Seventh Heaven' are apparent.

#15 Tony R

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:59 AM

View PostRushFanForever, on 01 February 2018 - 08:13 AM, said:

View PostTony R, on 01 February 2018 - 07:23 AM, said:


Not sure Rush were influenced by FM, certainly the band wasn’t formed until 1976, but certainly they one of the groups I explored because of their connection to Rush.

FM was a musical inspiration to RUSH during the 'Signals' era in my opinion.

Songs such as 'Random Harvest' and 'Seventh Heaven' are apparent.
Like I said I’m not sure if the influence wasn’t the other way. That album, Surveillance, seems to have been influenced by Rush, certainly the bass sound and the drumming (the lack of guitar notwithstanding) are reminiscent of Rush albums that predate it. they were certainly a quirky band with influences from all over the place; Genesis, Yes, Crimson, and even the underrated Harmonium.
That said, it could be as you say, I certainly understand where you are coming from with the Signals reference but that album was 3 years later.


#16 JohnnyBlaze

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 10:17 AM

View PostTony R, on 01 February 2018 - 09:59 AM, said:

View PostRushFanForever, on 01 February 2018 - 08:13 AM, said:

View PostTony R, on 01 February 2018 - 07:23 AM, said:


Not sure Rush were influenced by FM, certainly the band wasn’t formed until 1976, but certainly they one of the groups I explored because of their connection to Rush.

FM was a musical inspiration to RUSH during the 'Signals' era in my opinion.

Songs such as 'Random Harvest' and 'Seventh Heaven' are apparent.
Like I said I’m not sure if the influence wasn’t the other way. That album, Surveillance, seems to have been influenced by Rush, certainly the bass sound and the drumming (the lack of guitar notwithstanding) are reminiscent of Rush albums that predate it. they were certainly a quirky band with influences from all over the place; Genesis, Yes, Crimson, and even the underrated Harmonium.
That said, it could be as you say, I certainly understand where you are coming from with the Signals reference but that album was 3 years later.

I’ve never heard anything by FM, only knew of the name because of Rush. This is my first sampling of them due to RFF’s song-name dropping post:

(Please try to ignore the lame, fan made video itself.)

The song is certainly Signals-esque...or vice verse? Anyway, not bad at all.


#17 RushFanForever

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 10:41 AM

View PostTony R, on 01 February 2018 - 09:59 AM, said:

Like I said I’m not sure if the influence wasn’t the other way. That album, Surveillance, seems to have been influenced by Rush, certainly the bass sound and the drumming (the lack of guitar notwithstanding) are reminiscent of Rush albums that predate it. they were certainly a quirky band with influences from all over the place; Genesis, Yes, Crimson, and even the underrated Harmonium.
That said, it could be as you say, I certainly understand where you are coming from with the Signals reference but that album was 3 years later.

The 'Surveillance' album was released in 1979 and 'Signals' was released in 1982.

The electric mandolin playing almost comes across as an electric guitar.

Edited by RushFanForever, 01 February 2018 - 10:43 AM.


#18 RushFanForever

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 10:57 AM

I also discovered these obscure 60's Canadian rock bands courtesy of RUSH when they were mentioned in interviews. Good stuff.

Kensington Market

Mandala

The Paupers

The Ugly Ducklings

Edited by RushFanForever, 01 February 2018 - 10:58 AM.


#19 zappafrank

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:18 PM

I might have to get into FM.

Any suggestions as to where to start?

#20 RushFanForever

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:24 PM

This excerpt below is part of Teamrock's 2016 interview with FM founder Cameron Hawkins.

Recommended Listening

Black Noise (1977)

FM’s impressive debut album set the standard against which the others are judged. Their unique format – Cameron Hawkins’ spacey synths, expressive bass and smooth vocals; Martin Deller’s busy percussion; and the enigmatic Nash The Slash on violin, electric mandolin and rawer vocal – is unusual but interesting. Sci-fi themes abound in the dark title track, Journey’s upbeat groove and the aggressive instrumental Slaughter In Robot Village, but it was the US radio hit Phasors On Stun that would best marry their echoey instrumentation and crazy rhythms with a pop sensibility, one that would endure throughout the following decades.

City Of Fear (1980)

By album number four – their third with future kd Lang/Heart/Geddy Lee producer Ben Mink on violin and electric mandolin – they’d dropped space rock for a sparser, angrier sound based around Mink’s distorted mandolin. Produced by electronic pioneer Larry Fast (Synergy/Peter Gabriel), the stark soundscapes of Krakow, the catchy Power and the soaring Surface To Air are among the highlights. The mandolin could almost be a guitar on the rocking Riding The Thunder, while Nobody At All is the closest they ever got to a heartfelt ballad, with Mink’s beautiful violin showing exactly why he would soon guest on Rush’s Losing It.

Transformation (2015)

Organic but no less eclectic, Cameron Hawkins and the new four-piece line-up delivered a different sound for the band. The multi-layered opener Brave New Worlds, the commercial Reboot, Re-awaken and orchestral Safe And Sound all add quality to the legacy, along with other quirky songs that make up a bold but also pleasingly familiar release. Ed Bernard’s viola adds a melancholy tone to a complex record that proves to be one of their most dramatic statements.




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