Jump to content


of 2000s Bro Country and 1980s Glam Metal


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 fraroc

fraroc

    Solar Federalist

  • Members
  • 2469 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Rock music, roller coasters, aviation, writing novels,

Posted 27 November 2017 - 07:18 PM

The main similarity between bro country and glam metal is that both of these subgenres get criticized a lot for being too much of a "corperate and mainstream" version of the respective country and metal genres.  For me, it would be no contest, I would choose hair metal in this case, even if it was a very cheesy band like Poison.

I never was a huge fan of country music, especially pop country and bro country. I honestly do not like the fact that a lot of people think that bro country is a suitable replacement for rock and metal in the modern era.

I may not agree with a lot of what Dave Mustaine says, but he does have a point in this article. https://www.guitarwo...settled-country

He's basically saying that metal musicians that had trouble finding success in this industry have begun to settle for playing with bro country acts like Brantley Gilbert and Randy Houser. As much as I'm happy that these musicians are finding success, I do feel it's a bit bothersome that country has kind of become this "back up plan" for rock and metal musicians.

And hell, even some pre-existing metal musicians have gone country. A perfect example for this would be how Ron Keel is nowadays. You can tell he wants his visage to be this leather clad, cowboy hat wearing country boy that happens to be a good guitarist. Meanwhile, people who knew of his first band back in the mid 80s know a much different Ron Keel, a guy with an amazing, beautiful voice who makes kick ass 80s rock n' roll music.

In my heart I know I'm a fan of metal, not country. And if I become a musician when I get older, I really can't see myself putting on a cowboy hat and singing with a Texan drawl. That's just not who I am.

Sponsored Post

#2 treeduck

treeduck

    Tenacious T

  • Members *
  • 84526 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester, England

Posted 27 November 2017 - 07:21 PM

I saw Ron Keel supporting Dio in Leeds in 1986. He pretty much sucked.

#3 fraroc

fraroc

    Solar Federalist

  • Members
  • 2469 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Rock music, roller coasters, aviation, writing novels,

Posted 27 November 2017 - 07:30 PM

73 can you move this to Music of The Spheres?

#4 blueschica

blueschica

    What the Puck?

  • Members
  • 5967 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Central Pa
  • Interests:Camping, gardening, muscle cars, NASCAR, Rush!

Posted 27 November 2017 - 07:45 PM

View Postfraroc, on 27 November 2017 - 07:18 PM, said:

The main similarity between bro country and glam metal is that both of these subgenres get criticized a lot for being too much of a "corperate and mainstream" version of the respective country and metal genres.  For me, it would be no contest, I would choose hair metal in this case, even if it was a very cheesy band like Poison.

I never was a huge fan of country music, especially pop country and bro country. I honestly do not like the fact that a lot of people think that bro country is a suitable replacement for rock and metal in the modern era.

I may not agree with a lot of what Dave Mustaine says, but he does have a point in this article. https://www.guitarwo...settled-country

He's basically saying that metal musicians that had trouble finding success in this industry have begun to settle for playing with bro country acts like Brantley Gilbert and Randy Houser. As much as I'm happy that these musicians are finding success, I do feel it's a bit bothersome that country has kind of become this "back up plan" for rock and metal musicians.

And hell, even some pre-existing metal musicians have gone country. A perfect example for this would be how Ron Keel is nowadays. You can tell he wants his visage to be this leather clad, cowboy hat wearing country boy that happens to be a good guitarist. Meanwhile, people who knew of his first band back in the mid 80s know a much different Ron Keel, a guy with an amazing, beautiful voice who makes kick ass 80s rock n' roll music.

In my heart I know I'm a fan of metal, not country. And if I become a musician when I get older, I really can't see myself putting on a cowboy hat and singing with a Texan drawl. That's just not who I am.

Interesting article, fraroc, and interesting thought.  I disagree a little, but I'm not putting down your opinion, I just think that some of the musicians have to live in whatever musical world is happening around them. I'm not surprised that this is what is happening; Nashville is a very hot music scene right now from all accounts so it makes sense that musicians looking for a job would head there. I think each musician has to make peace with themselves and their career direction, and Dave Mustaine should respect that.  Neil has stated in interviews that he was depressed about job prospects at one point and he decided he was NOT going to be one of those guys in a weekend band or polka band, saying, "But I still get to do music!"  However, not everyone has the resolve or single mindedness of Neil Peart or the income of Dave Mustaine and yet they would still like to make a living with their playing.

#5 treeduck

treeduck

    Tenacious T

  • Members *
  • 84526 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester, England

Posted 27 November 2017 - 07:58 PM

View Postblueschica, on 27 November 2017 - 07:45 PM, said:

View Postfraroc, on 27 November 2017 - 07:18 PM, said:

The main similarity between bro country and glam metal is that both of these subgenres get criticized a lot for being too much of a "corperate and mainstream" version of the respective country and metal genres.  For me, it would be no contest, I would choose hair metal in this case, even if it was a very cheesy band like Poison.

I never was a huge fan of country music, especially pop country and bro country. I honestly do not like the fact that a lot of people think that bro country is a suitable replacement for rock and metal in the modern era.

I may not agree with a lot of what Dave Mustaine says, but he does have a point in this article. https://www.guitarwo...settled-country

He's basically saying that metal musicians that had trouble finding success in this industry have begun to settle for playing with bro country acts like Brantley Gilbert and Randy Houser. As much as I'm happy that these musicians are finding success, I do feel it's a bit bothersome that country has kind of become this "back up plan" for rock and metal musicians.

And hell, even some pre-existing metal musicians have gone country. A perfect example for this would be how Ron Keel is nowadays. You can tell he wants his visage to be this leather clad, cowboy hat wearing country boy that happens to be a good guitarist. Meanwhile, people who knew of his first band back in the mid 80s know a much different Ron Keel, a guy with an amazing, beautiful voice who makes kick ass 80s rock n' roll music.

In my heart I know I'm a fan of metal, not country. And if I become a musician when I get older, I really can't see myself putting on a cowboy hat and singing with a Texan drawl. That's just not who I am.

Interesting article, fraroc, and interesting thought.  I disagree a little, but I'm not putting down your opinion, I just think that some of the musicians have to live in whatever musical world is happening around them. I'm not surprised that this is what is happening; Nashville is a very hot music scene right now from all accounts so it makes sense that musicians looking for a job would head there. I think each musician has to make peace with themselves and their career direction, and Dave Mustaine should respect that.  Neil has stated in interviews that he was depressed about job prospects at one point and he decided he was NOT going to be one of those guys in a weekend band or polka band, saying, "But I still get to do music!"  However, not everyone has the resolve or single mindedness of Neil Peart or the income of Dave Mustaine and yet they would still like to make a living with their playing.
Mustaine went to Nashville in the 90's and recorded a couple of Megadeth albums there with Dann Huff who had moved there from LA after his band Giant disbanded. So this is why he has an opinion on country.

#6 J2112YYZ

J2112YYZ

    The Sphere

  • Members
  • 9892 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, NY

Posted 27 November 2017 - 08:21 PM

Wasn't even aware that Bro Country was a label of any kind. Poison was one of the better hair metal bands. They had good catchy tunes and they are proud to this day to be the big flag bearers for the genre. They were on the cheesy side but there were plenty more Poison knockoffs who were much worse.

I don't blame a musician if they decide to play a different genre of music than what they're a fan of if they see that it's better for them financially. Especially in country where it's common for performers to get their songs from outside writers. They can do half the work and still be hugely successful if any of the songs they choose to record become hits.

#7 Ancient Ways

Ancient Ways

    That's It™ Sig

  • Members
  • 16019 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:iEarth
  • Interests:Hanging out with my kids, riding my bike, playing guitar.

Posted 27 November 2017 - 08:22 PM

I had to look up bro country and I’m still not 100% sure I know what it is.  It claims it has a hard edge and then says FL/GA Line is bro country, lol.  Not what I would call a hard edge.

#8 Union 5-3992

Union 5-3992

    A Pale Boy with only Half a Brain

  • Members *
  • 21183 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The rich and sunny planet Ursa Minor Beta (or Buffalo NY)

Posted 27 November 2017 - 10:55 PM

Well Devin Townsend did go country a couple years ago...


#9 blueschica

blueschica

    What the Puck?

  • Members
  • 5967 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Central Pa
  • Interests:Camping, gardening, muscle cars, NASCAR, Rush!

Posted 27 November 2017 - 10:55 PM

View Posttreeduck, on 27 November 2017 - 07:58 PM, said:

View Postblueschica, on 27 November 2017 - 07:45 PM, said:

View Postfraroc, on 27 November 2017 - 07:18 PM, said:

The main similarity between bro country and glam metal is that both of these subgenres get criticized a lot for being too much of a "corperate and mainstream" version of the respective country and metal genres.  For me, it would be no contest, I would choose hair metal in this case, even if it was a very cheesy band like Poison.

I never was a huge fan of country music, especially pop country and bro country. I honestly do not like the fact that a lot of people think that bro country is a suitable replacement for rock and metal in the modern era.

I may not agree with a lot of what Dave Mustaine says, but he does have a point in this article. https://www.guitarwo...settled-country

He's basically saying that metal musicians that had trouble finding success in this industry have begun to settle for playing with bro country acts like Brantley Gilbert and Randy Houser. As much as I'm happy that these musicians are finding success, I do feel it's a bit bothersome that country has kind of become this "back up plan" for rock and metal musicians.

And hell, even some pre-existing metal musicians have gone country. A perfect example for this would be how Ron Keel is nowadays. You can tell he wants his visage to be this leather clad, cowboy hat wearing country boy that happens to be a good guitarist. Meanwhile, people who knew of his first band back in the mid 80s know a much different Ron Keel, a guy with an amazing, beautiful voice who makes kick ass 80s rock n' roll music.

In my heart I know I'm a fan of metal, not country. And if I become a musician when I get older, I really can't see myself putting on a cowboy hat and singing with a Texan drawl. That's just not who I am.

Interesting article, fraroc, and interesting thought.  I disagree a little, but I'm not putting down your opinion, I just think that some of the musicians have to live in whatever musical world is happening around them. I'm not surprised that this is what is happening; Nashville is a very hot music scene right now from all accounts so it makes sense that musicians looking for a job would head there. I think each musician has to make peace with themselves and their career direction, and Dave Mustaine should respect that.  Neil has stated in interviews that he was depressed about job prospects at one point and he decided he was NOT going to be one of those guys in a weekend band or polka band, saying, "But I still get to do music!"  However, not everyone has the resolve or single mindedness of Neil Peart or the income of Dave Mustaine and yet they would still like to make a living with their playing.
Mustaine went to Nashville in the 90's and recorded a couple of Megadeth albums there with Dann Huff who had moved there from LA after his band Giant disbanded. So this is why he has an opinion on country.
Yes, but where does he get off judging what other people do in their careers? He's assuming the artists he saw would rather be back playing metal, but he didn't ask. Not everyone is Dave Ellefson. PS I'm sick so I'm crabby.

Edited by blueschica, 27 November 2017 - 10:58 PM.


#10 treeduck

treeduck

    Tenacious T

  • Members *
  • 84526 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester, England

Posted 27 November 2017 - 11:01 PM

View Postblueschica, on 27 November 2017 - 10:55 PM, said:

View Posttreeduck, on 27 November 2017 - 07:58 PM, said:

View Postblueschica, on 27 November 2017 - 07:45 PM, said:

View Postfraroc, on 27 November 2017 - 07:18 PM, said:

The main similarity between bro country and glam metal is that both of these subgenres get criticized a lot for being too much of a "corperate and mainstream" version of the respective country and metal genres.  For me, it would be no contest, I would choose hair metal in this case, even if it was a very cheesy band like Poison.

I never was a huge fan of country music, especially pop country and bro country. I honestly do not like the fact that a lot of people think that bro country is a suitable replacement for rock and metal in the modern era.

I may not agree with a lot of what Dave Mustaine says, but he does have a point in this article. https://www.guitarwo...settled-country

He's basically saying that metal musicians that had trouble finding success in this industry have begun to settle for playing with bro country acts like Brantley Gilbert and Randy Houser. As much as I'm happy that these musicians are finding success, I do feel it's a bit bothersome that country has kind of become this "back up plan" for rock and metal musicians.

And hell, even some pre-existing metal musicians have gone country. A perfect example for this would be how Ron Keel is nowadays. You can tell he wants his visage to be this leather clad, cowboy hat wearing country boy that happens to be a good guitarist. Meanwhile, people who knew of his first band back in the mid 80s know a much different Ron Keel, a guy with an amazing, beautiful voice who makes kick ass 80s rock n' roll music.

In my heart I know I'm a fan of metal, not country. And if I become a musician when I get older, I really can't see myself putting on a cowboy hat and singing with a Texan drawl. That's just not who I am.

Interesting article, fraroc, and interesting thought.  I disagree a little, but I'm not putting down your opinion, I just think that some of the musicians have to live in whatever musical world is happening around them. I'm not surprised that this is what is happening; Nashville is a very hot music scene right now from all accounts so it makes sense that musicians looking for a job would head there. I think each musician has to make peace with themselves and their career direction, and Dave Mustaine should respect that.  Neil has stated in interviews that he was depressed about job prospects at one point and he decided he was NOT going to be one of those guys in a weekend band or polka band, saying, "But I still get to do music!"  However, not everyone has the resolve or single mindedness of Neil Peart or the income of Dave Mustaine and yet they would still like to make a living with their playing.
Mustaine went to Nashville in the 90's and recorded a couple of Megadeth albums there with Dann Huff who had moved there from LA after his band Giant disbanded. So this is why he has an opinion on country.
Yes, but where does he get off judging what other people do in their careers? He's assuming the artists he saw would rather be back playing metal, but he didn't ask. Not everyone is Dave Ellefson. PS I'm sick so I'm crabby.
Well Mustaine is just being Mustaine. :hail:

What's up with you? :o

#11 J2112YYZ

J2112YYZ

    The Sphere

  • Members
  • 9892 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, NY

Posted 27 November 2017 - 11:14 PM

I don't see anything wrong with what Mustaine said in that interview. He didn't come off to me as unfairly judging anyone. If he has met a lot of musicians in Nashville and his daughter is working with them, then I would say he's got a little more insight on the scene there then any of us do. How many times have we heard a musician say that someone was a huge influence on them yet they play a completely different genre of music? They probably are playing the style of music that could get them more gigs. Especially in Nashville which is a Country music hotbed. I'm guessing rock/metal muscians have a harder time making a living there so it's just easier to play country and make some money.

#12 blueschica

blueschica

    What the Puck?

  • Members
  • 5967 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Central Pa
  • Interests:Camping, gardening, muscle cars, NASCAR, Rush!

Posted 27 November 2017 - 11:20 PM

@ Treeduck, we had 11 people here on Thursday and now 8 of us are sick with bad colds. I feel like I gave everyone the plague! Luckily it was cyber Monday and a lot of online store specials available. We were planning awhile and got a new TV! My sister in Florida went out and got a 55 inch one! Not sure I could stand Rush that big, I would be tempted to grab Geddy,lol.

Edited by blueschica, 27 November 2017 - 11:29 PM.


#13 Lucas

Lucas

    Leave That Wrench Alone

  • Members
  • 10916 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NJ

Posted 27 November 2017 - 11:42 PM

Maybe some of these guitar players Dave is speaking of were just into metal when metal was more fashionable ??  .. and now they've just turned their attention to something else ..

There is always an audience if you are good - no matter what style you play .. plus, when you trace the roots back, country and metal both come from the same tree ..

And maybe some of these guitar players just want to move on .. Look at Dave's ex bandmate, Marty Friedman  - he moved to Japan, speaks fluent Japanese, performs and record with pop bands there but he still makes incredible solo albums in which metal is only part of the picture ..

Mike Ness of Social Distortion has been playing country music ( real country ) on the side for 20 years ... There's a connection, and I don't think a musician should be looked at for trading one thing in for another ..

Edited by Lucas, 27 November 2017 - 11:42 PM.


#14 ozzy85

ozzy85

    The Professor

  • Members *
  • 3335 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In the deep dark forest where the wolves run.
  • Interests:Metal. Beer. Powerbelching. \m/

Posted 28 November 2017 - 12:41 AM

Interesting thought and I get the point.

Interesting that it shows up soon after wondering about WTF about Garth Brooks.

But... what do you do when arena rock/metal is dying due to age and retirement? Not many are taking its place. Maybe its a holdover '90's thing where rock doesn't want to get bigger than clubs and theaters anymore. For the sake of credibility. Seems like country is occupying the arena rock spot now and doesn't care who doesn't like it. Kinda like metal in '87 or so.

As far as crossover artists... doesn't really bother me now. Nothing wrong with changing. You couldn't have asked me this 30 years ago. I would have flung a can of Olympia at your head. I've seen some of my metalhead/drag racing/cruising friends trade their Camaros and Crue for trucks and Garth back then. Not to metion a lot of newer country fans and country bands are quite into metal as their musical upbringing.

Maybe there is a slight interchangability.

I can understand it terms of wanting rock shows unsullied by other sh---... different stuff. But, as much fun as I had in 1987, it's 2017 now. I guess this is how it exists.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users