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New alt rock concept album... "Missing Pieces"


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#1 stoopid

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 07:10 PM

Been working on this album off/on in our spare time for almost 3 years.  Long time friend and collaborator Scott performed the vocals and wrote all the lyrics, I did everything else.  It closely follows Scott's real life engagement and breakup, so it became a living work of art as time progressed.  A few times over the course of those 3 years he was writing lyrics for parts of the story that a month later became a chapter in his own life.  Creepy!


It's about an hour long, divided into (13) individual songs [no instrumentals] :

http://www.youtube.c...s_23hH7sLmI6LCw


Bandcamp if you're more into that:

https://theboogeymen.../missing-pieces


Will be on Spotify and other streaming services soon too.

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#2 Lucas

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 07:36 PM

Listening right now

Good stuff !!

#3 Lucas

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 07:38 PM

Ahead is really good

#4 JARG

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 11:46 AM

Good stuff. I like how it's produced to sound relatively unproduced. The drums sound very natural and the vocals are right where they should be in the mix.

#5 stoopid

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:33 AM

View PostJARG, on 04 July 2017 - 11:46 AM, said:

Good stuff. I like how it's produced to sound relatively unproduced. The drums sound very natural and the vocals are right where they should be in the mix.

Old becomes new again.  Too many producers are overproducing nowadays using every single trick and tactic in 'the book' on every single song to the point they all sound the same.  There's still something to be said for being able to hear everything in a mix.  :codger:

#6 stoopid

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:35 AM

It was also important to keep a consistent sound from song to song as we knew from the start this was a long term project and needed the songs to at least sound remotely similar when put together, in order, years later.

#7 JARG

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:39 AM

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:35 AM, said:

It was also important to keep a consistent sound from song to song as we knew from the start this was a long term project and needed the songs to at least sound remotely similar when put together, in order, years later.

You did the same thing on the MOTH stuff. I can only imagine that that must be really hard when dealing with material that takes many months to produce/deliver. A lot can change even on the production side in a long-term project: gear, recording techniques, experience.

#8 JARG

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:44 AM

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:33 AM, said:

View PostJARG, on 04 July 2017 - 11:46 AM, said:

Good stuff. I like how it's produced to sound relatively unproduced. The drums sound very natural and the vocals are right where they should be in the mix.

Old becomes new again.  Too many producers are overproducing nowadays using every single trick and tactic in 'the book' on every single song to the point they all sound the same.  There's still something to be said for being able to hear everything in a mix.  :codger:

I totally agree. I love a bare-bones sounding production. I've really been digging Family Style, by the Vaughan brothers. It was produced back in the 90s when just about everything was all about sounding "big", but that record has a very "small" sound to it, if that makes any sense.



#9 stoopid

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:06 AM

View PostJARG, on 05 July 2017 - 09:39 AM, said:

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:35 AM, said:

It was also important to keep a consistent sound from song to song as we knew from the start this was a long term project and needed the songs to at least sound remotely similar when put together, in order, years later.

You did the same thing on the MOTH stuff. I can only imagine that that must be really hard when dealing with material that takes many months to produce/deliver. A lot can change even on the production side in a long-term project: gear, recording techniques, experience.

I did end up remastering the first 10 or so songs as I gained some new tools and experience using them.  Thankfully the mixes were good enough I didn't need to drastically remix anything.

#10 JARG

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:12 AM

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 10:06 AM, said:

View PostJARG, on 05 July 2017 - 09:39 AM, said:

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:35 AM, said:

It was also important to keep a consistent sound from song to song as we knew from the start this was a long term project and needed the songs to at least sound remotely similar when put together, in order, years later.

You did the same thing on the MOTH stuff. I can only imagine that that must be really hard when dealing with material that takes many months to produce/deliver. A lot can change even on the production side in a long-term project: gear, recording techniques, experience.

I did end up remastering the first 10 or so songs as I gained some new tools and experience using them.  Thankfully the mixes were good enough I didn't need to drastically remix anything.

Did you face similar issues on your project, or did knowing that your project was going to take a long time mean you paid attention to being consistent from the get-go?

#11 stoopid

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:14 AM

View PostJARG, on 05 July 2017 - 09:44 AM, said:

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:33 AM, said:

View PostJARG, on 04 July 2017 - 11:46 AM, said:

Good stuff. I like how it's produced to sound relatively unproduced. The drums sound very natural and the vocals are right where they should be in the mix.

Old becomes new again.  Too many producers are overproducing nowadays using every single trick and tactic in 'the book' on every single song to the point they all sound the same.  There's still something to be said for being able to hear everything in a mix.  :codger:

I totally agree. I love a bare-bones sounding production. I've really been digging Family Style, by the Vaughan brothers. It was produced back in the 90s when just about everything was all about sounding "big", but that record has a very "small" sound to it, if that makes any sense.



I think "thin" (like Presto, Roll the Bones) would be how I describe those mixes.  The Vaughan Brothers sounds better though than most thin recordings (most thin recordings lack any low end, it's literally missing, make the overall mix sound brittle).  Paul Simon's Graceland and most of Steely Dan's albums are borderline thin as well, but raising the volume a bit reveals there's much depth and precision in the mix.  Both are great examples of Mixing 101.  But by today's standards wouldn't sell a single copy because they're too weak to be played on earbuds at the same volume as the other tracks in the playlist.

#12 stoopid

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:17 AM

View PostJARG, on 05 July 2017 - 10:12 AM, said:

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 10:06 AM, said:

View PostJARG, on 05 July 2017 - 09:39 AM, said:

View Poststoopid, on 05 July 2017 - 09:35 AM, said:

It was also important to keep a consistent sound from song to song as we knew from the start this was a long term project and needed the songs to at least sound remotely similar when put together, in order, years later.

You did the same thing on the MOTH stuff. I can only imagine that that must be really hard when dealing with material that takes many months to produce/deliver. A lot can change even on the production side in a long-term project: gear, recording techniques, experience.

I did end up remastering the first 10 or so songs as I gained some new tools and experience using them.  Thankfully the mixes were good enough I didn't need to drastically remix anything.

Did you face similar issues on your project, or did knowing that your project was going to take a long time mean you paid attention to being consistent from the get-go?

I tried to use certain bass and guitar presets for particular tones (attitude) from song to song.  Thankfully it's easy to save the preset as a file and launch it in the next song you want to use it, as you know.  Did similar things with keyboard sounds, using bits of one keyboard effect in another to unify.   The relatively faint, spooky keyboard tone during the chorus of Changing Tunes got used again in another track (forget which though).  Many of the songs also have subtle musical progressions, call-backs, and themes that carry throughout.  If I didn't know they were there it would be difficult to make some of them out due to the stylistic changes between the songs.  I think subliminally it adds to the overall musical cohesiveness I was trying to achieve.

Edited by stoopid, 05 July 2017 - 11:09 AM.


#13 stoopid

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 02:56 PM

Since I'm not wealthy I started a Go Fund Me to help offset the advertising costs.  We'd like to get this in front of more people than just friends, family, and a few fans.

$5+ gets a free digital download of the album.  :)

https://www.gofundme.com/the-boogeymen

#14 Fridge

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 04:03 AM

Very nice indeed...I like the style and the mix




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