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Pedalboards or processing units?


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#1 TFEman

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 10:06 AM

Do most of you guys prefer pedalboards over processing units? I wanted to make a pedalboard rig with actual amps, but I found the processing units are more efficient. Still, it seems like the majority of you guys get the actual pedals.

Edited by TFEman, 07 May 2017 - 10:06 AM.


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#2 Maverick

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 07:52 PM

I've never had rack gear, but I think I will always prefer pedals. It's just who I am.

#3 stoopid

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:06 PM

View PostTFEman, on 07 May 2017 - 10:06 AM, said:

Do most of you guys prefer pedalboards over processing units? I wanted to make a pedalboard rig with actual amps, but I found the processing units are more efficient. Still, it seems like the majority of you guys get the actual pedals.

If you need elaborate effects in a live setting,  a rack processing setup is ideal because you can pre-program things and trigger/switch them with a foot switch.   Trying to replicate with pedals would likely requiring hitting multiple pedals at once. If you generally use one or two tones per song then a pedal board is fine.  Pedals are obviously fine for tinkering and noodling at home.   There's also some amps with decent processing built-in now, and similar to rack effects you can toggle programming with a foot switch.

#4 JARG

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 12:30 PM

My gigging rig was a rack system with the following components (all of which were sold long ago):

ADA B200S power amp
Posted Image


ADA MP-1 midi pre-amp:
Posted Image


Alesis Quadraverb:
Posted Image

Rocktron Hush Guitar Silencer:
Posted Image

ADA MPC midi controller:
Posted Image

I liked it because I could switch out many different parameters with just the tap of a button.

#5 Maverick

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 12:50 PM

My gigging rig is an assortment of pedals I feel like having that night, for those songs. I don't even have a pedal board.

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#6 Fridge

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 11:21 AM

I've tried both, and to be honest, pedalboards are good, but sometimes I like to switch two or three parameters at once, so then you need to start investing in loop switchers, which makes the process cumbersome.

Nowadays, I use an old Boss GT8 in the four cable method into my Blackstar and it works fine...I have the best of all worlds in that I can set the GT8 to manual mode and use it an stompboxes, or I can get it to control several parameters at once (eg boost, chorus and delay simultaneously), and I also get the advantage of the Blackstars tone with a minimum of digital interference.

#7 1-0-0-1-0-0-1

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 11:45 AM

I like both!

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Rack units for MIDI-controllable delays, reverb and harmonies (plus a Cry Baby rack wah), and analog pedals for modulation effects. The G-Major can do chorus, flange, phase and compression, but analog pedals sound better.

#8 Ancient Ways

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:10 PM

I'm using a line 6 unit that looks like a pedal board but is all simulation

#9 pjbear05

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 06:39 PM

Oops, wrong thread.  Though you meant bass pedal boards, like the Moog Taurus, or the Roland my musician friend (who's gear I used to haul to gigs) had at one time.

#10 jdouglas

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:21 PM

I've had many of both, and now I just have a simple digitech 360xp that is great. I have headphone patches for practice, and effects only patches for the effects loop playing live.  I use the expression pedal as a volume pedal.  I think the tc chorus on that unit is a great sim of the original.

#11 HemiBeers

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 03:04 PM

View PostJARG, on 08 May 2017 - 12:30 PM, said:

My gigging rig was a rack system with the following components (all of which were sold long ago):

ADA B200S power amp
Posted Image


ADA MP-1 midi pre-amp:
Posted Image


Alesis Quadraverb:
Posted Image

Rocktron Hush Guitar Silencer:
Posted Image

ADA MPC midi controller:
Posted Image

I liked it because I could switch out many different parameters with just the tap of a button.
If your power amplifier was bipolar did it go through different moods quite frequently? Today I'm a happy amp. Tomorrow a sad amp.




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