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Guitarist Has A Question For Drummers re Double Bass


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#1 Lucas

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:03 PM

I'm a lifelong guitar player who is interested in really learning the drums .. I've got a small Ludwig kit at the moment, and I know the basics ..

But I want to learn double bass, and I'd really like to hear any input on the pros/cons of adding another bass drum and pedal opposed to just getting a double pedal ..

The drummers who I have played with in the past have always used two bass drums, and I am not too familiar with the double pedal ..

Space or spending a little more on another bass drum isn't really an issue ..

Thanks everyone, rock on

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#2 goose

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:21 PM

Double pedal-single bass combo makes travel much easier.  Beyond that...here's what other drummers have to say:

http://www.drummerwo...ead.php?t=56496

First post is funny...and informative:

If you go with a double pedal, there are pro's and con's.
Pro: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.

However, if you do go with two kicks, then they become:
Pro: your kit will look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit will look like a double kick setup.

Other than that, double pedals are easier to lug around and you don't have to worry about your kicks sounding different from each other, unless that's something you want (some do).

I've done both, but for the last 20 years have done neither. Not my cup of tea.

However, if it was practical and aesthetically pleasing to me (it isn't), I'd opt for the two bass drums. Reason for that is I like the sound of two separate resonating chambers. Flams sound amazing on two bass drums (don't know why more double kick drummers don't take advantage of this), but it doesn't work as well with a double pedal because the second hit tends to kill the resonance of the first.

Edited by goose, 11 April 2017 - 10:24 PM.


#3 Lucas

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:55 PM

Goose, thanks ... There will be no touring for me :lol:

Just blowing off steam after work ... and recording demos

#4 Lucas

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:03 PM

View Postgoose, on 11 April 2017 - 10:21 PM, said:

Double pedal-single bass combo makes travel much easier.  Beyond that...here's what other drummers have to say:

http://www.drummerwo...ead.php?t=56496

First post is funny...and informative:

If you go with a double pedal, there are pro's and con's.
Pro: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.

However, if you do go with two kicks, then they become:
Pro: your kit will look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit will look like a double kick setup.

Other than that, double pedals are easier to lug around and you don't have to worry about your kicks sounding different from each other, unless that's something you want (some do).

I've done both, but for the last 20 years have done neither. Not my cup of tea.

However, if it was practical and aesthetically pleasing to me (it isn't), I'd opt for the two bass drums. Reason for that is I like the sound of two separate resonating chambers. Flams sound amazing on two bass drums (don't know why more double kick drummers don't take advantage of this), but it doesn't work as well with a double pedal because the second hit tends to kill the resonance of the first.


One guy mentioned two bass drums "moving the air" more, and that's definitely something that makes sense to me ... That the exact term I use when I tell people why I record the guitar with a Marshall stack and not a small amp ( or worse, direct )

If I am recording, the room mikes would probably pick up more "air" with two drums

#5 vaportrailer

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:31 PM

All I will add is to make sure that you work on your weak foot, or else you'll find double bass frustrating!
One decent exercise is to simply play along to something with both feet playing together. Sure, it will sound sloppy and flam-y at first, but it's a good way to get that other foot moving.


#6 Your_Lion

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 04:37 AM

Ah...now I understand!
The thread title had me confused...I couldn't imagine why you were asking drummers about:
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#7 YYZ Working Man

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 09:32 PM

3 words Tama Iron Cobra ... that should sum it up

#8 goose

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:26 PM

View PostYYZ Working Man, on 12 April 2017 - 09:32 PM, said:

3 words Tama Iron Cobra ... that should sum it up
I have the speed cobras and they're great.  I used to use a DW 5000 double pedal setup, but never really liked it.

#9 Lucas

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:32 PM

View Postgoose, on 12 April 2017 - 10:26 PM, said:

View PostYYZ Working Man, on 12 April 2017 - 09:32 PM, said:

3 words Tama Iron Cobra ... that should sum it up
I have the speed cobras and they're great.  I used to use a DW 5000 double pedal setup, but never really liked it.

Goose, I didn't know you played the drums !!

Have you been a drummer since childhood or is it more recent ??

#10 goose

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:43 PM

View PostLucas, on 12 April 2017 - 10:32 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 12 April 2017 - 10:26 PM, said:

View PostYYZ Working Man, on 12 April 2017 - 09:32 PM, said:

3 words Tama Iron Cobra ... that should sum it up
I have the speed cobras and they're great.  I used to use a DW 5000 double pedal setup, but never really liked it.

Goose, I didn't know you played the drums !!

Have you been a drummer since childhood or is it more recent ??
Since childhood.  I was too lazy and unfocused for guitar, which my mom and sister played quite well.  Now that I'm older I've taken up the ukulele, though, and I love it.

#11 Mr. JD

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:11 AM

View PostLucas, on 11 April 2017 - 11:03 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 11 April 2017 - 10:21 PM, said:

Double pedal-single bass combo makes travel much easier.  Beyond that...here's what other drummers have to say:

http://www.drummerwo...ead.php?t=56496

First post is funny...and informative:

If you go with a double pedal, there are pro's and con's.
Pro: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit won't look like a double kick setup.

However, if you do go with two kicks, then they become:
Pro: your kit will look like a double kick setup.
Con: your kit will look like a double kick setup.

Other than that, double pedals are easier to lug around and you don't have to worry about your kicks sounding different from each other, unless that's something you want (some do).

I've done both, but for the last 20 years have done neither. Not my cup of tea.

However, if it was practical and aesthetically pleasing to me (it isn't), I'd opt for the two bass drums. Reason for that is I like the sound of two separate resonating chambers. Flams sound amazing on two bass drums (don't know why more double kick drummers don't take advantage of this), but it doesn't work as well with a double pedal because the second hit tends to kill the resonance of the first.


One guy mentioned two bass drums "moving the air" more, and that's definitely something that makes sense to me ... That the exact term I use when I tell people why I record the guitar with a Marshall stack and not a small amp ( or worse, direct )

If I am recording, the room mikes would probably pick up more "air" with two drums

Wouldn't the amount of air you move only be more if you're hitting both the drums at the same time? How often do you do that?

Edited by Mr. JD, 13 April 2017 - 11:12 AM.


#12 Blue J

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:29 PM

View Postgoose, on 12 April 2017 - 10:43 PM, said:

View PostLucas, on 12 April 2017 - 10:32 PM, said:

View Postgoose, on 12 April 2017 - 10:26 PM, said:

View PostYYZ Working Man, on 12 April 2017 - 09:32 PM, said:

3 words Tama Iron Cobra ... that should sum it up
I have the speed cobras and they're great.  I used to use a DW 5000 double pedal setup, but never really liked it.

Goose, I didn't know you played the drums !!

Have you been a drummer since childhood or is it more recent ??
Since childhood.  I was too lazy and unfocused for guitar, which my mom and sister played quite well.  Now that I'm older I've taken up the ukulele, though, and I love it.

That was me, too. I don’t know if it was because I was unfocused. But I started playing the drums at age 12, and guitar at 38.

#13 toymaker

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 02:32 PM

I think some of the effects of these things have to be pretty subtle.  If you're doing a rapid double kick thing, why worry about resonance?  Why would you want more resonance?  It's not like you want two of the same-size toms when you do a drum fill.  Everything happens so fast - can the human ear really detect such things?  Just curious.

I guess I wonder the same things about "moving more air" . . .

I'm no audiophile, and the problem with me could be that I'm fine with settling for things - if the guitar sounds cool, it's good enough for me.  I'd never make a good recording/mixing engineer!  Probably anyone who heard any of my recordings would cringe (and not just because of the playing!)

Edited by toymaker, 17 January 2018 - 02:35 PM.





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